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As I posted in an other thread about this it is a VERY good idea whether you have city or well water to install an inline silt/sediment filter and an activated carbon or carbon block filter. It is a very simple fairly cheap DIY project and you'll be surprised at how it betters the quality and taste of your water. 

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We're very, very grateful to have great well water. 


 

"If I could start my life all over again, I would be a professional football player, and you damn well better believe I would be a Pittsburgh Steeler."

 

-- Jack Lambert --

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Okay, I am ticked off. I have a relative visiting here and staying at a local hotel. They were told by the hotel not to drink the water because of high levels of manganese. I just learned this a short time ago. They are being given bottled water to drink. Yet the post by the City of DuBois on Facebook says it's believed to be manganese. They would know if there is an increased level of manganese, and it is not necessarily safe to drink because we have no idea what levels we're talking about or if it's naturally occurring or from pollution. But instead of notifying their water customers directly about this issue last week, they post a notice on Facebook and put a statement out to a TV station. Talk about a lack of transperancy:

Water Problems — Manganese

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Manganese is a mineral that naturally occurs in rocks and soil and may also be present due to underground pollution sources. Manganese is seldom found alone in a water supply. It is frequently found in iron-bearing waters but is more rare than iron. Chemically it can be considered a close relative of iron since it occurs in much the same forms as iron. When manganese is present in water, it is every bit as annoying as iron, perhaps even more so. In low concentrations it produces extremely objectionable stains on everything with which it comes in contact. Deposits collect in pipelines, and tap water may contain black sediment and turbidity due to precipitated manganese. When fabrics are washed in manganese-bearing water, dark brown or black stains are formed due to the oxidation of the manganese.

manganeseThe U.S. EPA Secondary Drinking Water Regulations recommend a limit of 0.05 mg/l manganese because of the staining which may be caused. For many industrial purposes the manganese content should not exceed 0.01 to 0.02 mg/l. And in some cases this is even considered excessive. In concentrations higher than 0.05 mg/l the manganese may become noticeable by impairing color, odor, or taste to the water. However, according to the EPA health effects are not a concern until concentrations are approximately 10 times higher.

What health effects can manganese cause?
Manganese can be consumed from our diet and in our drinking water. Bathing and showering in manganese containing water does not increase your exposure since manganese does not penetrate the skin and doesn’t get into the air. High exposure to manganese has been associated with toxicity to the nervous system, producing a syndrome that resembles Parkinsonism. Manganese is unlikely to produce other types of toxicity such as cancer or reproductive damage. Young children appear to absorb more manganese than older age groups but excrete less. This makes it particularly important for pregnant women and children to have clean drinking water.

Due to the fact that dissolved manganese oxidizes slower than iron, it is generally more difficult to remove from water. Pure elemental manganese metal is gray tinged with pink, brittle and somewhat harder than iron which it resembles. The pure metal is not found in nature. However, this chemically active element is found in many compounds. Deposits occur in certain portions of this country as well as in other parts of the world.

Manganese is present most frequently as a manganous ion (Mn++) in water. Salts of man­ganese are generally more soluble in acid than in alkaline water. In this way they are similar to iron. The manganous ion is usually introduced to water through the solubility of manganous bicarbonate.

 

Water Problems — Manganese

 
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Further, some surface waters and shallow wells contain organic or colloidal* manganese compounds. Manganese bacteria can also cause problems similar to those caused by iron bacteria-clogging, staining, etc.

Suspended insoluble manganic hydroxide, known as "black water," while not rare, is less common. This is probably due to the fact that a much higher pH is necessary to precipitate manganic hydroxide than is necessary to the production of ferric hydroxide.

Manganese bicarbonate in solution is colorless. The result is that unaerated deep well waters containing manganous ions are clear when freshly drawn. Exposure to the air soon converts the clear, soluble manganous ions into the black insoluble substance that is manganese dioxide. Then the trouble begins. The reactions occurring when manganous ions are converted to manganese dioxide are as follows:

Reaction occurring in the oxidation of manganese
2Mn++ + O + 2Hz0 –›  2Mn2 + 4H+  
Manganous ions plus oxygen plus water reacts to produce manganese dioxide plus hydrogen ions

Light concentrations of manganese can be removed with a water softener. Higher concentrations may be removed with oxidizing filters with considerable success. Very high manganese concentrations, or those complicated by organic matter, etc., call for chemical oxidation, as with iron, plus filtration.

Note that chlorine will not completely oxidize manganese unless the pH is above 9.5, whereas potassium permanganate is effective at pH values above 7.5. Thus, permanganate is the preferred oxidizing agent in most cases.

*Colloidal: Containging or pertaining to colloids which are insoluble particles. These particles are larger than molecules but small enough so that they remain suspended in a liquid without settling. A colloid does not affect the freezing point, boiling point or vapor tension of the liquid in which it is 

http://www.freedrinkingwater.com/water_quality/chemical/water-problems-manganese-page2.htm

 

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33 minutes ago, NikonSniper said:

As I posted in an other thread about this it is a VERY good idea whether you have city or well water to install an inline silt/sediment filter and an activated carbon or carbon block filter. It is a very simple fairly cheap DIY project and you'll be surprised at how it betters the quality and taste of your water. 

I have something like that at my home. Works great. The city is always bragging how great their water is. Last year the drought was the blame. I am starting to wonder if they have the ability to manage the system.

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10 hours ago, Keyser Soze said:

I have something like that at my home. Works great. The city is always bragging how great their water is. Last year the drought was the blame. I am starting to wonder if they have the ability to manage the system.

We know DuBois has the ability to mis-manage the system, so they ought to be able to also manage it.  The issue several of us have danced around, is the city's ability to use the water system as a "cash cow" for other endeavors.  I just hope "short cuts" were not taken, resulting in the present problem.  I do have to add, though, my morning coffee has never tasted better.  But I'm wondering if that may be because the coloration (discoloration) has deadened my tastes.


<p>Watch out for the wild beasts! 

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The problem with water quality occurs regularly in TL.  You keep several jugs of clean water on hand all the time.  A recent chat with a water company rep told us that a new well was being used, and the new water is extremely soft, which explains why it feels oily; and, they attribute air bubbles to why it often looks milky.  We keep filters on the main line for sediment and a carbon filter for drinking, but the costs add up as you need to change the filters monthly, which is in addition to what you pay for water. 

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It should be OBVIOUS to everyone the city has subversivly slipped us all onto the well "water" system he put together.  I 've had city workers tell me how bad the quality is from these wells.  I guess the fracking trucks won't mind (if they ever come back).

Who knows! Maybe a few tankers of manganese rolled into the reservoir...

Screenshot_20170808-212223~2.png

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Has anyone tried washing white/ light clothes?  I keep holding off but can't forever.  I certainly don't want my clothes ruined.  According to the news the City has no more to say about this.  Really,its gone on way too long.

 

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5 hours ago, mollycan said:

Has anyone tried washing white/ light clothes?  I keep holding off but can't forever.  I certainly don't want my clothes ruined.  According to the news the City has no more to say about this.  Really,its gone on way too long.

 

Seriously? They actually said the officials who work for the citizens have no more to say about the condition of people's drinking water?

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What is a concern, is that I noticed a deposit on the outside of the tub spout under shower head.  This is a new fixture in a new bathroom.  The city's water system has some issues that they're being very closed mouth about. 


<p>Watch out for the wild beasts! 

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37 minutes ago, Ignatius said:

What is a concern, is that I noticed a deposit on the outside of the tub spout under shower head.  This is a new fixture in a new bathroom.  The city's water system has some issues that they're being very closed mouth about. 

Isn't manganese corrosive? 

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Build another ball field . Don't worry about streets you can't drive down or the water we have to drink. You need a permit to build to make your place nice  in this town but if you just want to let your house or rentals fall in and be a mess that's free.

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People always bring up ball fields when mad about something in DuBois. Is the city paying for the Challenger field or is Little League? Little League rakes in a lot of money each year between paying to play and fundraisers so i am curious since so many people think the city is paying for it.

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2 hours ago, soccermom said:

Isn't manganese corrosive? 

management is ! ..........when water line work on that hill stops the water clears a bit , and the water storage tank is just above that street where line work was . were the iron and manganese mines there last century ?

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30 minutes ago, falsecreek said:

management is ! ..........when water line work on that hill stops the water clears a bit , and the water storage tank is just above that street where line work was . were the iron and manganese mines there last century ?

What hill are we talking about?

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2 hours ago, soccermom said:

Isn't manganese corrosive? 

It can be, and can also be detrimental to the health of those drinking it.  It can also build up, as deposits, inside of water lines. 

 


<p>Watch out for the wild beasts! 

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2 minutes ago, Ignatius said:

It can be, and can also be detrimental to the health of those drinking it.  It can also build up, as deposits, inside of water lines. 

 

I'm wondering the opposite. Can manganese corrode the layer that forms on the inside of pipes, allowing bad metals and minerals into the drinking water.

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1 hour ago, Lyndsey33 said:

People always bring up ball fields when mad about something in DuBois. Is the city paying for the Challenger field or is Little League? Little League rakes in a lot of money each year between paying to play and fundraisers so i am curious since so many people think the city is paying for it.

Isn't it "free" CDBG federal money?

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20 minutes ago, soccermom said:

I'm wondering the opposite. Can manganese corrode the layer that forms on the inside of pipes, allowing bad metals and minerals into the drinking water.

This is the issue:  we simply do not know and that's leading to speculation, particularly because of the city's silence.


<p>Watch out for the wild beasts! 

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Just saw WTAJ (channel 10) is going  to have an update from city officials on tonights evening news.  Not sure if it will air at 5 or 6pm


Life is what happens to you, when you're busy making other plans ~ John Lennon
 

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