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Homeless Man Asked Woman To Move Her Porsche So He Could Sleep, She Shot Him

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Homeless man asked woman to move Porsche so he could sleep. Then she shot him, police say.

The Washington Post
 
Katie Layne, also known as Katie Quakenbush, in a music video.© YouTube via East Nashville News Katie Layne, also known as Katie Quakenbush, in a music video.

Around 3 a.m. one Saturday morning last month, Gerald Melton was trying to sleep — as he often did — on a sidewalk near Nashville’s Music Row, known as the heart of the city’s entertainment industry.

But the 54-year-old homeless man was “disturbed” by the smell of exhaust fumes and the sound of loud music emanating from a white Porsche SUV nearby, Nashville metro police said in a news release. He asked the driver to move the Porsche, prompting a shouting match between the two. At some point, Melton walked back to the area where he had been trying to sleep, he told police.

Then, the driver, a 26-year-old woman named Katie Quackenbush, allegedly stepped out of the Porsche and fired two gunshots at Melton, hitting him in the stomach, police said. She then got back in her SUV and fled the area.

On Monday, Quackenbush, an aspiring singer and songwriter, was charged with attempted murder in connection with the Aug. 26 shooting. She was booked into jail and released after posting a $25,000 bond. Melton was critically wounded and remains hospitalized at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, police said.

The news of Quackenbush’s arrest stirred outrage on social media and from advocates of the homeless. It’s also not her first time arrested in connection to a violent incident. In December, Quackenbush was charged with misdemeanor assault after striking a woman in the head with a drinking glass, according to records cited by the Tennessean. The case is still pending.

Almost four years ago, she was arrested on a misdemeanor domestic assault charge after hitting another woman. The charge was later dropped.

Her father, Jesse Quackenbush, a well-known defense attorney in Amarillo, Tex., spoke out against the allegations and provided a very different account of how the Aug. 26 events unfolded. In a statement to WTVF, he said his daughter was “actually acting in self defense.”

Jesse Quackenbush said in the statement that his daughter had been in her vehicle with another woman when Melton began “verbally accosting them.”

“The man was always on his feet and not asleep” as police had said, the father contended.

He told NewsChannel 5 that the homeless man banged on the car windows, screaming profanities and threatening to kill them unless she turned the music down.

His daughter told him, “I have a gun. Stay away from me,” Jesse Quackenbush said.

Katie Quackenbush has been charged with attempted murder in the shooting of a homeless man in Nashville last month.© Metro Nashville Police Department via AP Katie Quackenbush has been charged with attempted murder in the shooting of a homeless man in Nashville last month.

She then shot one “warning shot,” intended to scare him away, the father said in his written statement to WTVF. When he “kept coming,” she fired another shot.

After the second shot, “he still kept coming forward, she jumped in the driver side and sped away because she was afraid for her life,” Quackenbush told NewsChannel5.

“She’s a victim in this more so than Mr. Melton,” he said. “If anything he’s the one that should’ve stayed laying down on the ground and stayed away from young women that night.”

Speaking to the Tennessean, Quackenbush said his daughter “closed her eyes when she shot both times.” She said she did not know that the man was hit by the gunfire.

“She didn’t try and kill this guy,” Quackenbush told the Tennessean.

Katie Quackenbush’s defense attorney, Peter Strianse, told the newspaper, “She was dealing with somebody that came out of an extremely dark street in the early morning hours who comes out of nowhere and is banging violently on the car window.”

“Somebody who appears to be either deranged, somebody who may be on some sort of drug, who seems completely unhinged, and that’s why she reacted the way that she did,” he added.

Both Katie Quackenbush and the other woman in the Porsche contacted the district attorney’s office “shortly” after the encounter, and both “always agreed to cooperate fully with the investigation,” Jesse Quackenbush said in his written statement to WTVF.

However, Nashville police spokesman Don Aaron told the Tennessean that neither Quackenbush nor the woman with her initially reported the incident to police. Another person who found Melton wounded called authorities for help. The police department didn’t hear anything from Quackenbush until her attorney reached out to the prosecutor’s office at the start of the following week.

“There’s no doubt that there was an argument and yelling between both parties,” Aaron said. But police have no information that Quackenbush was blocked or prevented from leaving in her car.

Jesse Quackenbush was formerly a film and television writer, director and producer, according to his website. He now specializes in litigating auto accidents, medical malpractice and criminal defense cases.

A quote at the top of his website reads: “My career-long goal has been to treat every client as though they were a member of my own family.”

Katie Quackenbush appears to have released a number of songs on YouTube and iTunes under the name Katie Layne.

“Katie Layne Music” on YouTube describes her as an “American Blues, Rock and Roll vocalist.”

In one music video, titled “Outlaw Love,” she is featured jumping a fence and running away from a law enforcement officer as he aims a gun at her.

“I’m definitely a sinner, I’ve never been a saint,” she sings in one part of the song.

Lindsey Krinks, who works in homeless outreach and co-founded a nonprofit called Open Table Nashville, spoke about the allegations with NewsChannel 5.

“There’s a big power imbalance between the players in this situation,” Krinks said. “There is an excessive use of force in violence with the gun, so anytime there is an excessive use of force, people who abuse their power need to be held accountable.”

Little is known about Gerald Melton. But according to local station WSMV, he is a skilled guitarist and singer.

Sharon Corbitt-House, who manages a number of big-name artists on Music Row, told the station that Melton used to live in the parking lot behind her building for about a year. “I had no clue that he was as talented as he was,” she said.

Once hearing him perform, she launched a crowdfunding page to help Melton move into temporary housing. Not long after, though, he was back living on the streets of Music Row, she told WSMV.

She said while she never noticed him to be a volatile person, she had heard a couple of people describe times in which he raised his voice or become angry.

WSMV broadcast a video from December 2016 that captured Melton singing and playing guitar. He apparently also goes by the first name “Doug.”

That video appears to still be available on YouTube. In it, the bald, white-bearded man is seen strumming an acoustic guitar and singing the song, “Does He Love You Enough.”                                                 http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/homeless-man-asked-woman-to-move-porsche-so-he-could-sleep-then-she-shot-him-police-say/ar-AArRlsa?li=BBnb4R7&ocid=HPCDHP

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I have a cousin that is a minister, and very, very active with the homeless of Nashville. If there was "outrage on social media and from advocates of the homeless", then I am fairly certain she was involved. I texted her to see if she has an opinion on this story, but haven't heard back yet.

Wait! I read the rest of the story. Lindsey Krinks, that's her :o

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8 minutes ago, lavender said:

No saints nor sinners in this one. The law will decide who is more in the wrong but not before the press has a field day with it. Both could use a bit of mental health counseling. 

Agreed. If you watch the news story, they interview Lindsey. She and I really are very close, and are usually polar opposites on politics. We sat at her mother's dining room table 3 weeks ago and had a very lively debate on the 2016 election :funny4:

 She is also the sweetest, kindest, most sincere person I know, and she can get me to look at things in a way no one else could. And one thing you could appreciate, she went to one of those high falutin' liberal arts colleges ;) 

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There was a feature article in today's Pittsburgh paper on this incident. What also really grabbed me was in the text that read " Metro Nashville Police say Mellon was disturbed by exhaust fumes and loud music coming Quackenbush's Porsche SUV while trying to sleep at 3 a.m. and asked her to move the vehicle." PORSCHE SUV! What if she had been driving a FORD or some other brand. I seriously doubt they would have given the name of the SUV. Porsche just probably added a "certain cachet" to her and the piece. Also, the loud music was probably one of her numbers. Are we showing off or what??

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I agree that the use of the Porsche name in this particular article was used to exemplify the type of person that was the shooter ---- as the story at that point was made to bring attention to the homeless man being shot.  However, let's not forget that she did shoot at the man and FLED the scene without reporting it for a week making her a wanted person since she did hit him.  That made the type of vehicle extremely important to the original story of finding an attempted murder suspect and gave fodder to the homeless advocate writers.   Her past made it even juicier for them not to resist.  Sounds like her daddy has rescued her from similar situations before and that tops off why the story has some legs.  Of course I could be wrong ...

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4 hours ago, landfillguy said:

Agreed. If you watch the news story, they interview Lindsey. She and I really are very close, and are usually polar opposites on politics. We sat at her mother's dining room table 3 weeks ago and had a very lively debate on the 2016 election :funny4:

 She is also the sweetest, kindest, most sincere person I know, and she can get me to look at things in a way no one else could. And one thing you could appreciate, she went to one of those high falutin' liberal arts colleges ;) 

Well, I hope the "high falutin' liberal arts colleges" didn't give her unreal expectations of the nobility of the homeless, poor and general downtrodden. Nor the general greed and unworthiness of those who can afford to drive a Porsche. Nor the opposite in either case although the do tend to teach the former.  Residence in either group does not give a person an excuse for not acting with common sense and exercising reasonable behavior.Shooting someone who approaches you, unless they lay hands on you, is not acceptable but then can one expect everyone to be quiet so they can get a good night's sleep on the street even at 3 a.m.? I still think that they both have mental issues. Too bad that their paths crossed. Now Porsche owners everywhere are in the dog house. 

 

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27 minutes ago, lavender said:

Well, I hope the "high falutin' liberal arts colleges" didn't give her unreal expectations of the nobility of the homeless, poor and general downtrodden. Nor the general greed and unworthiness of those who can afford to drive a Porsche. Nor the opposite in either case although the do tend to teach the former.  Residence in either group does not give a person an excuse for not acting with common sense and exercising reasonable behavior.Shooting someone who approaches you, unless they lay hands on you, is not acceptable but then can one expect everyone to be quiet so they can get a good night's sleep on the street even at 3 a.m.? I still think that they both have mental issues. Too bad that their paths crossed. Now Porsche owners everywhere are in the dog house. 

 

She definitely has more compassion for the homeless than I do, she just grew up differently than I did. When I see homeless, the first thought that comes into my head is " drug addict" because of my dad. She has a lot of personal interaction with them, and while she will acknowledge that there are those who fit my stereotype, she can tell you stories of many who just drew some short straws in life. That's what I meant when I said she can make me see things in ways that no one else can. She respects and understands why I feel the way I do, but we can have intelligent debate with each other without getting angry. She is a really special person

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39 minutes ago, landfillguy said:

She definitely has more compassion for the homeless than I do, she just grew up differently than I did. When I see homeless, the first thought that comes into my head is " drug addict" because of my dad. She has a lot of personal interaction with them, and while she will acknowledge that there are those who fit my stereotype, she can tell you stories of many who just drew some short straws in life. That's what I meant when I said she can make me see things in ways that no one else can. She respects and understands why I feel the way I do, but we can have intelligent debate with each other without getting angry. She is a really special person

Oh, I understand it in my head but deep down I don't really believe that it is necessary to live on the street. I think it is a choice and it is made for various reasons. Some problems like mental illness are probably uncontrollable although there is help for that as well. How many people who have mental illness just choose to not take the drugs that keep it under control?  The law makes it impossible for relatives to take control. Alcohol or drugs are more important than family or a decent life to some.  There are people who can't or won't follow rules so they can live with relatives or elsewhere among people While there are people out there who have a catastrophic event they don't stay there long. They get the help that they need and get back on their feet.  They do what they have to do.  We are not a cruel people and I think Americans are the most generous people on earth. It is just impossible to give these people housing and support on their terms and that is what they want. Or like this fellow they don't even want the housing and support. 

I have little compassion for adults who make bad choices. I'll save what little I have left, after seeing people do what they do,  for the children that are forced to live with the results. I hope your cousin manages to hang on to her compassion. Too many of us have had it burned out by dealing with life. 

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2 hours ago, Petee said:

She could easily have driven away.

After firing two rounds inside the city against a perceived threat to her life without reporting it herself?  She knew she hit him and ran away.  

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8 minutes ago, Titan said:

After firing two rounds inside the city against a perceived threat to her life without reporting it herself?  She knew she hit him and ran away.  

Oh you mean could have driven away without firing.  My mistake on context.

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19 hours ago, lavender said:

Oh, I understand it in my head but deep down I don't really believe that it is necessary to live on the street. I think it is a choice and it is made for various reasons. Some problems like mental illness are probably uncontrollable although there is help for that as well. How many people who have mental illness just choose to not take the drugs that keep it under control?  The law makes it impossible for relatives to take control. Alcohol or drugs are more important than family or a decent life to some.  There are people who can't or won't follow rules so they can live with relatives or elsewhere among people While there are people out there who have a catastrophic event they don't stay there long. They get the help that they need and get back on their feet.  They do what they have to do.  We are not a cruel people and I think Americans are the most generous people on earth. It is just impossible to give these people housing and support on their terms and that is what they want. Or like this fellow they don't even want the housing and support. 

I have little compassion for adults who make bad choices. I'll save what little I have left, after seeing people do what they do,  for the children that are forced to live with the results. I hope your cousin manages to hang on to her compassion. Too many of us have had it burned out by dealing with life. 

I feel exactly the same way you do about everything you said. My dad is a diagnosed manic depressive (bipolar) who chose not to use prescribed treatment. He is a homeless drug addict who is where he is because of choices he made. That is the image in my mind for every homeless person I see. Lindsey can give many examples of people who had their rugs swept out from under them with no control. I still can't feel any other way than the way I do, but Lindsey has gotten me to at least give the homeless the benefit of the doubt before I have all the facts.

I spoke to her last night, and she said she had spent the afternoon at the hospital with him. She said it's a very sad situation, he has definitely had some hardships in his life, and he doesn't even have legal representation yet. Thats what she is helping him with. She said "Advocating for the homeless doesn't necessarily mean defending them". She is a very interesting person, and I enjoy the way she gets me to look at things from another angle

 

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18 minutes ago, jaman said:

Spoiled privileged daughter of a big local lawyer. Ill get my Daddy after you. "Quakenbush" LOL Ill leave it at that.:lol:

When I was talking to Lindsey I said " and her dad seems like a real azzhole, too. Sorry Reverend."

She said, " No need to apologize, I agree" :lol:

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6 hours ago, landfillguy said:

I feel exactly the same way you do about everything you said. My dad is a diagnosed manic depressive (bipolar) who chose not to use prescribed treatment. He is a homeless drug addict who is where he is because of choices he made. That is the image in my mind for every homeless person I see. Lindsey can give many examples of people who had their rugs swept out from under them with no control. I still can't feel any other way than the way I do, but Lindsey has gotten me to at least give the homeless the benefit of the doubt before I have all the facts.

I spoke to her last night, and she said she had spent the afternoon at the hospital with him. She said it's a very sad situation, he has definitely had some hardships in his life, and he doesn't even have legal representation yet. Thats what she is helping him with. She said "Advocating for the homeless doesn't necessarily mean defending them". She is a very interesting person, and I enjoy the way she gets me to look at things from another angle

 

I'm sorry to hear about your dad.  There are many people with bipolar disorder who refuse treatment and most live a life in chaos.  With treatment, the disease is more manageable, but certainly, the person does not feel "normal".  When you factor in drugs or alcohol (which are often used to self-medicate), it's hard to fathom how anyone can make informed decisions about their life.  Keep Lindsey in your life, and clone her if you can. The world needs more people who see beyond the surface and advocate for the less fortunate.  

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10 hours ago, TucsonSunset said:

I'm sorry to hear about your dad.  There are many people with bipolar disorder who refuse treatment and most live a life in chaos.  With treatment, the disease is more manageable, but certainly, the person does not feel "normal".  When you factor in drugs or alcohol (which are often used to self-medicate), it's hard to fathom how anyone can make informed decisions about their life.  Keep Lindsey in your life, and clone her if you can. The world needs more people who see beyond the surface and advocate for the less fortunate.  

She's definitely a very special person. Her mom is my dad's sister, and where I grew up with my dad's issues, Lindsey's parents were a pediatrician and a CPA. We both understand that we are the way we are because of the different ways we grew up, and we both enjoy getting each others' perspective. She's 12 years younger than me, so we weren't very close growing up, but we reconnected as adults. I was texting with her last night about the shooting in Nashville, and our family in general, and she said "I really believe that we learn and begin healing through safe relationships, so I'm very thankful for you and the mutual respect we have. It's cool to disagree but to also find the common ground."

I plan on keeping her in my life ;)

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