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As Temperatures Drop, Pa. Pet Owners Could Face Stiffer Penalties For Leaving Animals In The Cold

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As temperatures drop, Pa. pet owners could face stiffer penalties for leaving animals in the cold

New law took effect earlier this year

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As temperatures drop, Pa. pet owners could face stiffer penalties for leaving animals in the cold

New law took effect earlier this year

 

The possibility of record-low temperatures on Saturday morning in the Pittsburgh area has sparked a reminder about a new law in the state.

Libre’s Law, signed by Gov. Tom Wolf over the summer, increases penalties in animal neglect cases, including for leaving animals out in the cold too long.

The law says animals cannot be tied up outdoors for more than 30 minutes when the temperatures are lower than 32 degrees or higher than 90 degrees.

Violations related to Libre's Law range can lead to a fine or even jail time with a maximum possible sentence of 6 to 12 months.

The forecast currently calls for highs in the 30s on Friday and a drop into the teens early Saturday morning. The current record low for Nov. 11th is 21 degrees, set in 1973                                                         http://www.wtae.com/article/as-temperatures-drop-pa-pet-owners-could-face-stiffer-penalties-for-leaving-animals-in-the-cold/13514301

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As temperatures drop, Pennsylvania pet owners face stiffer penalties for leaving animals in the cold

As temperatures drop, Pennsylvania pet owners face stiffer penalties for leaving animals in the cold
 
 

Bitter wind chills and below-freezing temperatures throughout the Pittsburgh area Tuesday have sparked a reminder about a new law in the state.

Libre's Law, signed by Gov. Tom Wolf over the summer, increases penalties in animal neglect cases, including for leaving animals out in the cold too long.

The law says animals cannot be tied up outdoors for more than 30 minutes when the temperatures are lower than 32 degrees or higher than 90 degrees.

Violations related to Libre's Law range can lead to a fine or even jail time with a maximum possible sentence of 6 to 12 months.

The forecast currently calls for low temperatures in the teens and wind chills of -5 to -10 degrees Tuesday night, with highs in the low 20s and gusty winds again on Wednesday.

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Pittsburgh man charged after leaving dog in freezing temps

 

Investigators said they found dog bloody, emaciated

Pittsburgh man charged after leaving dog in freezing temps

Investigators said they found dog bloody, emaciated

 
 
 
Pittsburgh man charged after leaving dog in freezing temps
by WTAE US
 
 

A man is facing animal cruelty charges after leaving his dog outside in freezing temperatures.

 

Charles C. Phillips is charged with two felony counts of animal cruelty after investigators said he left his dog "Loki" outside on his front porch all night long.

Investigators said the dog had blood on its nose and mouth and paws when they saw it on the morning after Christmas.

Investigators said Phillips admitted to keeping the dog outside all night and said he did it because the dog had bit him.

The dog was taken to the police department for warmth and then taken to Humane Animal Rescue for treatment and evaluation.

Investigators said the dog weighed under 26 lbs. while it used to weight 60 lbs.

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This is a great law in my opinion..There is no reason for your pet to be outside freezing while you are in the house warm. The reason you got them was to make them family but would you let your child sit outside all night/day in this weather. Doubtful. My kitties are inside and warm and even have their own blankets and beds! 

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2 outside cats love their heated cat houses.


All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. George Orwell.

Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires. John Steinbeck.

Freedom isn't free, so stop whining and pay your taxes. Me.

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Man Charged with Animal Neglect under Libre’s Law

police-300x174.jpgBANKS TWP., Pa. (EYT) – An Indiana County man is being charged with Neglect of an Animal under Pennsylvania’s newly strengthened animal protection laws.

Punxsutawney Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Paige Pifer reported January 2 that Rudy J. Wengerd had an animal tethered for more than 30 minutes in temperatures lower than 32 degrees.

Under Libre’s Law, new legislation strengthening Pennsylvania’s animal protection statutes signed into effect on June 29, 2017, an animal cannot be tethered outside for more than 30 minutes whenever the temperature exceeds 90 degrees or falls below 32 degrees.

Other provisions in Libre’s Law relating to tethered dogs include:

  • No more than 9 hours tethered in 24-hour period
  • Tether must be the longer of 3 times length of dog or 10 feet.
  • Must have water and shade.
  • Must be secured by an appropriate collar — no tow or log chain, nor choke, pinch, prong, or chain collars.
  • Tethered space must be clear of excessive waste.
  • No open sores or wounds on the dog’s body.

More information on Libre’s Law is available here.                                                                                                                                                                                                               http://www.explorejeffersonpa.com/indiana-man-charged-with-animal-neglect-under-new-law/

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Breeders charged after dogs found outside in cold weather

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Three dog breeders in Pennsylvania are facing 130 criminal counts stemming from a raid in which authorities said some dogs were found outside in freezing temperatures and others were inside in squalid conditions. (MGN)

WAPWALLOPEN, Pa. -- Three dog breeders in Pennsylvania are facing 130 criminal counts stemming from a raid in which authorities said some dogs were found outside in freezing temperatures and others were inside in squalid conditions.

State police say they were called to the Conyngham Township property Dec. 31 after a report that 11 dogs were outside in temperatures that neared zero degrees.

Wayne Harvey, a humane officer with the Luzerne County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals who filed the charges, says the dogs' water was frozen solid and "they were licking it for moisture."

The SPCA and state police later served a search warrant and reported finding 19 more dogs in filthy conditions. Authorities say the defendants face multiple counts of aggravated cruelty to animals and animal neglect.

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2 Jefferson County residents charged after dog found dead, another rescued

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Two Jefferson County residents face charges after they were accused of abandoning two dogs at their home without food and water. (MGN)

TIMBLIN – Two Jefferson County residents face charges after they were accused of abandoning two dogs at their home without food and water.

David Williams, 39, and Gia Weyandt, 34, both of the 100 block of Church Street, Timblin, face aggravated cruelty to animals and neglect of animal charges as a result of the new Libre’s Law restrictions regarding animals in the state.

According to a criminal complaint, officials found one dog dead upstairs, and another was seized from the property and is currently at Willow Run Animal Sanctuary in Brookville.

The complaint said state police contacted Jefferson County’s humane police Officer Debbie McAndrew on Dec. 22 concerning a complaint about an abandoned dog.

Officials said they found the dead dog and rescued the other.

McAndrew said that the three upstairs rooms were covered in feces.                                                                                                                                                                                http://wjactv.com/news/local/2-jefferson-county-residents-charged-after-dog-found-dead-another-rescued

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Pennsylvania ranks most improved for animal protection laws

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Gov. Tom Wolf said Wednesday that Pennsylvania demonstrated marked improvements as two national organizations recently issued reports ranking animal protection laws in all 50 states. (MGN)

HARRISBURG -- Gov. Tom Wolf said Wednesday that Pennsylvania demonstrated marked improvements as two national organizations recently issued reports ranking animal protection laws in all 50 states.

Both the Humane Society of the United States and the Animal Legal Defense Fund report that Pennsylvania’s Act 10 of 2017, the animal abuse overhaul package Wolf signed into law in June 2017 was a key reason why Pennsylvania’s rankings improved.

“With the signing of Act 10 of 2017, we began to hold our pet and animal owners to a higher standard of humanity,” Wolf said in a news release. “Recognition of Pennsylvania’s efforts by the Humane Society and Animal Legal Defense Fund confirms that my administration, our General Assembly, and strong advocates worked well together to establish laws that protect the pets and animals we love and whose care we have been entrusted with.”

According to the Animal Legal Defense Fund report, titled “U.S. Animal Protection Laws Rankings,” Pennsylvania was the most improved state in 2017, jumping 20 places to No. 24 on the list ranking the animal protection laws of all 50 states.

The Animal Legal Defense Fund noted, “This achievement is thanks to major improvements like a new felony provision for first-time offenders of aggravated animal cruelty (including torture), and granting civil immunity to veterinarians who report suspected animal abuse.”

For the 10th year in a row, Illinois ranked first, followed by Oregon, California, Maine and Rhode Island.

Pennsylvania’s position moved up from No. 18 to 15 on the Humane Society of the United States’ Humane State rankings.

Animals are protected by a combination of state and local laws, which vary widely in terms of strength. Act 10 of 2017, Pennsylvania’s comprehensive animal protection law, was the first significant strengthening of Pennsylvania’s animal protection statutes in nearly 30 years.

The package of bills included Libre’s Law, named after one dog whose shocking story of mistreatment and miraculous recovery helped spur a broader discussion of animal protection.

Five key components of the legislation included improved tethering conditions for outside dogs, additional protections for horses, increased penalties for animal abuse, provisions that mandate that convicted animal abusers forfeit abused animals to a shelter, and granting civil immunity from lawsuits for licensed doctors of veterinary medicine, technicians, and assistants who report animal cruelty in good faith.

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