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Reynoldsville Woman Waives Hearing On Misrepentation Of Perscription Drugs

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Reynoldsville Woman Waives Preliminary Hearing on Misrepresentation of Prescription Drugs

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REYNOLDSVILLE, Pa. (EYT) – A Reynoldsville woman who is facing drug and related charges after allegedly stealing a prescription waived her preliminary hearing.

According to court documents, the following criminal charges against 43-year-old Holly Jo Conley, of Reynoldsville, were transferred to Jefferson County Court of Common Pleas:

– Acquire Or Obtain Possession Of Controlled Substance by Misrepresentation, Felony
– Theft By Unlawful Taking-Movable Property, Misdemeanor 1
– Receiving Stolen Property, Misdemeanor 2
– Intentionally Possessing a Controlled Substance By Person Not Registered, Misdemeanor

Conley remains lodged in the Jefferson County Jail on $5,000.00 monetary bail.

According to a criminal complaint filed by Reynoldsville Borough Police, around 5:00 p.m. on January 17, a known man arrived at the station to report that a prescription was missing from his residence, and he suspected Holly Marsh-Conley had stolen it.

The victim told Officer Murray, of the Reynoldsville Borough Police Department, that a doctor had given him two prescriptions for two 80-day supplies of Percoset in December, one to be filled in January and one to be filled in February. On January 4, the victim looked in the drawer where he kept the prescriptions and discovered that one of the prescriptions was missing.

The victim informed his doctor who advised him that the prescription had been filled on January 15.

The pharmacist informed Officer Murray that the prescription was filled and signed for by “Holly Marsh” at 12:39 p.m. on January 15. The prescription was filled with the generic brand of Percocet, being oxycodone with acetaminophen, the complaint states.

When interviewed, Holly Marsh-Conley allegedly acknowledged she took the prescription and filled it, and she admitted to using the prescription.

She was taken into custody and transported to the Reynoldsville Borough Police Department.                                                                                                                                                                                                  http://www.explorejeffersonpa.com/reynoldsville-woman-waives-preliminary-hearing-on-misrepresentation-of-prescription-drugs/

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Okay, I am also troubled by the fact a doctor gave someone two 80-day supples in December, one to be filled in January, and one to be filled in February. I am also troubled by the fact that someone other than the person named on the prescription was able to fill it. How are these types of incidents still occurring?

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22 hours ago, soccermom said:

Okay, I am also troubled by the fact a doctor gave someone two 80-day supples in December, one to be filled in January, and one to be filled in February. I am also troubled by the fact that someone other than the person named on the prescription was able to fill it. How are these types of incidents still occurring?

The person who received the prescriptions from the doctor and the physician did nothing wrong.  It is permissible for a patient to receive additional prescriptions for a later date.  For many with chronic pain, going to the doctor's office monthly is not an easy task.  It was probably not two 80 day supplies, but two 80 count supplies, one each for 30 days.  Doctors are only permitted to write narcotic prescriptions for a 30 day supply, but they are allowed to write, and post date, prescriptions for up to 90 days. 

19 hours ago, Lyndsey33 said:

I am always surprised that ID isnt required when picking up a script of a controlled substance 

ID is required, and a signature must be obtained to receive these prescriptions from the pharmacy. The person who stole the prescriptions is known to the patient who received the prescriptions.  Perhaps the arrested person had filled medications for the victim before. 

 

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46 minutes ago, jnksma said:

The person who received the prescriptions from the doctor and the physician did nothing wrong.  It is permissible for a patient to receive additional prescriptions for a later date.  For many with chronic pain, going to the doctor's office monthly is not an easy task.  It was probably not two 80 day supplies, but two 80 count supplies, one each for 30 days.  Doctors are only permitted to write narcotic prescriptions for a 30 day supply, but they are allowed to write, and post date, prescriptions for up to 90 days. 

ID is required, and a signature must be obtained to receive these prescriptions from the pharmacy. The person who stole the prescriptions is known to the patient who received the prescriptions.  Perhaps the arrested person had filled medications for the victim before. 

 

Wait a minute. We supposedly have an opiod epidemic. We're told we need Narcan in schools, and to be given out by EMTs. PA recently passed laws meant to tighten up these issues. Yet we continually see arrests made in this area of doctors and physician's assistance wrongly prescribing opioids, people misusing presciptions, and other people stealing the prescriptions.

Yet time after time, we have people on this forum defend these types of cases. It's ridiculous.

The story clearly said prescriptions for "two 80-day supplies of Percoset in December, one to be filled in January and one to be filled in February."

The story also says the victim noted one of the prescriptions was missing on January 4th. They called the doctor about the missing prescription. The story doesn't say when the doctor was called, but does say the doctor advised the victim the prescription was filled on January 15th. It does not say whether the police were contacted by the doctor or the victim.

The pharmacist informed the police that the prescription was filled on January 15th, so they did indeed fill the presciption for someone other than the victim. 

Seems to me we need to move beyond the volunteer stage:

Dr. Levine said the guidelines were developed by the Safe and Effective Prescribing Practice Task Force, a group of physicians, nurses, state agency leaders and community advocates. She said the guidelines encourage the “judicious” prescribing of opioid pain medications as well as other clinical efforts before opioids are used.

Really, opioids should be one of the last treatments for acute pain or chronic pain, as opposed to the first treatment that's prescribed,” Dr. Levine said.

The state board of medicine also will hold a special session in August to review the guidelines for geriatrics, obstetrics and gynecology and treatment of opioid use disorder in pregnant women, Dr. Levine said.

Dr. Levine said the guidelines were developed by the Safe and Effective Prescribing Practice Task Force, a group of physicians, nurses, state agency leaders and community advocates. She said the guidelines encourage the “judicious” prescribing of opioid pain medications as well as other clinical efforts before opioids are used.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in May reported the results of a six-month investigation showing that, from 2011 through 2015, in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee, 608 doctors were disciplined by state medical boards for overprescribing narcotics.

Of the seven, Pennsylvania was the least likely to discipline a doctor for prescribing too many narcotics. States that vigorously policed physicians — often using narcotics guidelines and prescription databases — tended to see steeper declines in opioid consumption, the investigation found. Only Kentucky saw overdoses decline."

http://www.post-gazette.com/news/overdosed/2016/07/19/Pa-pharmacy-board-approves-new-opioid-guidelines-but-medical-board-doesn-t-commit/stories/201607190150

 

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5 hours ago, jnksma said:

The person who received the prescriptions from the doctor and the physician did nothing wrong.  It is permissible for a patient to receive additional prescriptions for a later date.  For many with chronic pain, going to the doctor's office monthly is not an easy task.  It was probably not two 80 day supplies, but two 80 count supplies, one each for 30 days.  Doctors are only permitted to write narcotic prescriptions for a 30 day supply, but they are allowed to write, and post date, prescriptions for up to 90 days. 

ID is required, and a signature must be obtained to receive these prescriptions from the pharmacy. The person who stole the prescriptions is known to the patient who received the prescriptions.  Perhaps the arrested person had filled medications for the victim before. 

 

I have had to sign for pain killers..its been a couple years but i never was asked to show id. I had Vicodin. I only had to sign.

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On 2/14/2018 at 11:10 AM, soccermom said:

Wait a minute. We supposedly have an opiod epidemic. We're told we need Narcan in schools, and to be given out by EMTs. PA recently passed laws meant to tighten up these issues. Yet we continually see arrests made in this area of doctors and physician's assistance wrongly prescribing opioids, people misusing presciptions, and other people stealing the prescriptions.

Yet time after time, we have people on this forum defend these types of cases. It's ridiculous.

The story clearly said prescriptions for "two 80-day supplies of Percoset in December, one to be filled in January and one to be filled in February."

The story also says the victim noted one of the prescriptions was missing on January 4th. They called the doctor about the missing prescription. The story doesn't say when the doctor was called, but does say the doctor advised the victim the prescription was filled on January 15th. It does not say whether the police were contacted by the doctor or the victim.

The pharmacist informed the police that the prescription was filled on January 15th, so they did indeed fill the presciption for someone other than the victim. 

Seems to me we need to move beyond the volunteer stage:

Dr. Levine said the guidelines were developed by the Safe and Effective Prescribing Practice Task Force, a group of physicians, nurses, state agency leaders and community advocates. She said the guidelines encourage the “judicious” prescribing of opioid pain medications as well as other clinical efforts before opioids are used.

Really, opioids should be one of the last treatments for acute pain or chronic pain, as opposed to the first treatment that's prescribed,” Dr. Levine said.

The state board of medicine also will hold a special session in August to review the guidelines for geriatrics, obstetrics and gynecology and treatment of opioid use disorder in pregnant women, Dr. Levine said.

Dr. Levine said the guidelines were developed by the Safe and Effective Prescribing Practice Task Force, a group of physicians, nurses, state agency leaders and community advocates. She said the guidelines encourage the “judicious” prescribing of opioid pain medications as well as other clinical efforts before opioids are used.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in May reported the results of a six-month investigation showing that, from 2011 through 2015, in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee, 608 doctors were disciplined by state medical boards for overprescribing narcotics.

Of the seven, Pennsylvania was the least likely to discipline a doctor for prescribing too many narcotics. States that vigorously policed physicians — often using narcotics guidelines and prescription databases — tended to see steeper declines in opioid consumption, the investigation found. Only Kentucky saw overdoses decline."

http://www.post-gazette.com/news/overdosed/2016/07/19/Pa-pharmacy-board-approves-new-opioid-guidelines-but-medical-board-doesn-t-commit/stories/201607190150

 

Not everyone who is prescribed an narcotic is an abuser of them.  If you are in chronic pain, these medications are the only thing that will help you get through the day. You don't become high from them, and you are never completely pain free.  They help you live a productive life and help you function and not dwell on the pain.  There is a place for these types of medications, but unfortunately not everyone will use them the way they are prescribed.  This is true of all medications.  The really unfortunate thing with all of the drug abuse, is honest people, who use their medications as instructed and don't sell or abuse them, are made to feel like criminals by many people who don't understand chronic pain and how debilitating it can be to a person's life and well being.

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40 minutes ago, jnksma said:

Not everyone who is prescribed an narcotic is an abuser of them.  If you are in chronic pain, these medications are the only thing that will help you get through the day. You don't become high from them, and you are never completely pain free.  They help you live a productive life and help you function and not dwell on the pain.  There is a place for these types of medications, but unfortunately not everyone will use them the way they are prescribed.  This is true of all medications.  The really unfortunate thing with all of the drug abuse, is honest people, who use their medications as instructed and don't sell or abuse them, are made to feel like criminals by many people who don't understand chronic pain and how debilitating it can be to a person's life and well being.

The biggest question I have is how could doctors have allowed this to happen? 

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Why do people look away when someone else purposely runs a stop sign and does it repeatedly.  Surprisingly enough, it's probably for the same reason.


"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil but by those who watch them without doing anything"

Albert Einstein

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7 minutes ago, jnksma said:

Allowed what to happen?  A person be in pain. 

To immediately prescribe opioids. Pain is subjective. A lot of pain people feel will go away if it's from a treatable injury. It's your bodies way of telling you you're injured. If you are on strong pain medications, how do you know if you're healing?

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3 hours ago, soccermom said:

To immediately prescribe opioids. Pain is subjective. A lot of pain people feel will go away if it's from a treatable injury. It's your bodies way of telling you you're injured. If you are on strong pain medications, how do you know if you're healing?

If you have been in chronic pain, for multiple years, you know it is not going away.  This man may have been on pain medications for many years.  If you have completely healed and you are still in pain, that is the chronic type of pain.  It is not the same as breaking your leg or having a tooth pulled.  That is acute pain, and giving a person pain medication for 7 to 10 days would seem reasonable.  If you have chronic pain, it is with you all the time.  Think how you would feel if your body felt like it does when you bang your shin, but all the time.  It never goes away.  There are many people who have this type of pain.  It could be from an accident, a disease or some type of birth defect.  These are the people who have chronic pain and will need opioids their entire life, just so they can have some semblance of normalcy in their lives.  Pain medications for these people have usually been slow coming. Most of them have tried many other things, such as physical therapy and other medications.  Pain medication was a last resort. And their pain is probably still felt, just no consuming their every thought, every day.  Without pain medication, that is what their lives would be and that is no way to live.

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7 hours ago, jnksma said:

If you have been in chronic pain, for multiple years, you know it is not going away.  This man may have been on pain medications for many years.  If you have completely healed and you are still in pain, that is the chronic type of pain.  It is not the same as breaking your leg or having a tooth pulled.  That is acute pain, and giving a person pain medication for 7 to 10 days would seem reasonable.  If you have chronic pain, it is with you all the time.  Think how you would feel if your body felt like it does when you bang your shin, but all the time.  It never goes away.  There are many people who have this type of pain.  It could be from an accident, a disease or some type of birth defect.  These are the people who have chronic pain and will need opioids their entire life, just so they can have some semblance of normalcy in their lives.  Pain medications for these people have usually been slow coming. Most of them have tried many other things, such as physical therapy and other medications.  Pain medication was a last resort. And their pain is probably still felt, just no consuming their every thought, every day.  Without pain medication, that is what their lives would be and that is no way to live.

But you're speaking as if everyone who gets opioids is like you describe. We know that isn't the case. Doctors are giving them to people for even sport's injuries that will heal. I can't understand why, since they are now causing a backlash that will only hurt people who do really need them.

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Most doctors should be more limited in how many pain medications they are permitted to give, and the doctor should be given  regulations to follow when a patient becomes too needy or demanding of pain medications.  My daughter worked for a doctor whose major problem was patients who just wanted to show up for pain medications.  It was a constant battle and the only way to deny a patient was to refer them to a qualified pain clinic, not just a doctor who repeatedly gives out pain medication.  That's a prescription for trouble.

Check out what a qualified Pain Clinic does:  https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/pain-clinics-all-about#1

It's not just about pills.


"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil but by those who watch them without doing anything"

Albert Einstein

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On 2/19/2018 at 7:42 PM, soccermom said:

But you're speaking as if everyone who gets opioids is like you describe. We know that isn't the case. Doctors are giving them to people for even sport's injuries that will heal. I can't understand why, since they are now causing a backlash that will only hurt people who do really need them.

I know not everyone is using their medications as prescribed.  But many people are following all of the guidelines given and are made to feel like criminals.  And that is the point, not everyone on pain medication is an addict who will move on to heroin.  Making those who truly need a medication suffer because others are using them criminally is not the solution to the problem.

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