Jump to content
GoDuBois.com
Sign in to follow this  
Polo

DID YOU VOTE TODAY?

Recommended Posts

No, I did not vote yet, but I will on my way home from work.  I can't believe no one is talking about this yet today!  Usually someone has something to say about it.  I won't get into who I'm voting for because I don't want to start anything.  Just want to hear that folks are out voting and using their voice!


Every day is a gift from God; that's why we call it the "present!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just voted....although not many on the ballot.  More voting workers at the polling place than voters.


"Take off is optional....landing is mandatory"

"It is easier to preach ten sermons than it is to live one."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The SC primaries are a month away. I hate that we lost Nikki Haley to the UN. Part of that appointment was Trump handing the governorship to McMaster for his early support in the 2106 election. Have y'all seen him? He looks like he should be the next Col. Sanders in the commercials, like he should be standing on the porch of a plantation, sipping lemonade and watching the "help". When he talks, all I can hear is "Boy, I say boy, I come to bury the hatchet with ya. No, not in yore pointed head, son..."

He sets perception of SC back 200 years.

His main competitor is a bought and paid for candidate who is spending millions on ridiculous campaign commercials.

I want Nikki back

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pompeii said:

I'm eating early dinner in about 20 minutes. 

Up north we call dinner around 5pm  = supper :twl:

 

 

We call it supper, too, but down here we can have dinner for lunch, as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LFG said:

We call it supper, too, but down here we can have dinner for lunch, as well

For those too busy to Wiki - - - See. especially, the last paragraph (in RED).

SUPPER

The term is derived from the French souper, which is used for this meal in Canadian French, Swiss French, and sometimes in Belgian French. It is related to soup. It is also related to the Scandinavian word for soup, soppa' and the German word for soup, Suppe. The Oxford English Dictionary, however, suggests that the root, sup, remains obscure in origin.[1]

The distinction between dinner and supper was common in United States farming communities into the twentieth century, especially in the Mid-West and the American South, though today, most Americans consider the two synonyms and strongly prefer the term dinner for the evening meal. During World War II, rations in the U.S. military were still divided into breakfast, dinner, and supper, using the traditional designations for meals. In most parts of the United States and Canada today, "supper" and "dinner" are considered synonyms (although supper is a more antiquated term). In Saskatchewan, and much of Atlantic Canada, "supper" means the main meal of the day, usually served in the late afternoon, while "dinner" is served around noon. "Dinner" is used in some areas, such as Newfoundland and Labrador, to describe the noon meal as well as special meals, such as "Thanksgiving dinner", "flipper dinner" or "Christmas dinner," the evening meal being "supper." The word "supper" is also regionally reserved for harvest meals put on by churches and other community organizations: "fowl suppers" or "fall suppers" (featuring turkey) are common in Canada; "pancake suppers" given by church groups were once a tradition in the United States; and "bean suppers" (featuring baked beans) were traditional in New England and especially the state of Maine.[3]

"Supper" may refer to, on largely class-based distinctions, either a late-evening snack (working and middle class usage) or else to make a distinction between "supper" as an informal family meal (which would be eaten in the kitchen or family dining room) as opposed to "dinner", a generally grander affair (either or both in terms of the meal and the courses within the meal itself), which would be eaten in the best dining room, could well have guests from outside the household, and for which there might be a dress code.[

P.S. I voted this A.M.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Traveler said:

Our Democracy is strengthened by voting. If inclined not to vote, ask yourself this question, "what if I didn't have the right to vote, what then?"

What then?  We would be navigating up a river of excrement in a native American water vessel with no means of propulsion 


"Take off is optional....landing is mandatory"

"It is easier to preach ten sermons than it is to live one."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Voted first thing this morning. 

 


 

"If I could start my life all over again, I would be a professional football player, and you damn well better believe I would be a Pittsburgh Steeler."

 

-- Jack Lambert --

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Roger Natti said:

For those too busy to Wiki - - - See. especially, the last paragraph (in RED).

SUPPER

The term is derived from the French souper, which is used for this meal in Canadian French, Swiss French, and sometimes in Belgian French. It is related to soup. It is also related to the Scandinavian word for soup, soppa' and the German word for soup, Suppe. The Oxford English Dictionary, however, suggests that the root, sup, remains obscure in origin.[1]

The distinction between dinner and supper was common in United States farming communities into the twentieth century, especially in the Mid-West and the American South, though today, most Americans consider the two synonyms and strongly prefer the term dinner for the evening meal. During World War II, rations in the U.S. military were still divided into breakfast, dinner, and supper, using the traditional designations for meals. In most parts of the United States and Canada today, "supper" and "dinner" are considered synonyms (although supper is a more antiquated term). In Saskatchewan, and much of Atlantic Canada, "supper" means the main meal of the day, usually served in the late afternoon, while "dinner" is served around noon. "Dinner" is used in some areas, such as Newfoundland and Labrador, to describe the noon meal as well as special meals, such as "Thanksgiving dinner", "flipper dinner" or "Christmas dinner," the evening meal being "supper." The word "supper" is also regionally reserved for harvest meals put on by churches and other community organizations: "fowl suppers" or "fall suppers" (featuring turkey) are common in Canada; "pancake suppers" given by church groups were once a tradition in the United States; and "bean suppers" (featuring baked beans) were traditional in New England and especially the state of Maine.[3]

"Supper" may refer to, on largely class-based distinctions, either a late-evening snack (working and middle class usage) or else to make a distinction between "supper" as an informal family meal (which would be eaten in the kitchen or family dining room) as opposed to "dinner", a generally grander affair (either or both in terms of the meal and the courses within the meal itself), which would be eaten in the best dining room, could well have guests from outside the household, and for which there might be a dress code.[

P.S. I voted this A.M.

Regarding the portion in red, see my :arghh:post in the 5 Foods Americans call by different names thread. I said exactly the same thing, and didn't even need Wiki:good:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LFG said:

Regarding the portion in red, see my :arghh:post in the 5 Foods Americans call by different names thread. I said exactly the same thing, and didn't even need Wiki:good:

 

Absolutely correct.  However, you're a Debate/Political Forum vet, so I'd have expected you to give a source.  Ha!  Also, in your ramblings about southern foods, I was reminded of a I'm With Busey episode in which Gary Busey approached a book publisher with an idea for a cook book featuring the many ways to prepare road kill.  Thanks for the memory.  That TV show was too short-lived.  It was often entertaining to the twisted mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Roger Natti said:

Absolutely correct.  However, you're a Debate/Political Forum vet, so I'd have expected you to give a source.  Ha!  Also, in your ramblings about southern foods, I was reminded of a I'm With Busey episode in which Gary Busey approached a book publisher with an idea for a cook book featuring the many ways to prepare road kill.  Thanks for the memory.  That TV show was too short-lived.  It was often entertaining to the twisted mind.

As a Debate Forum vet, I don't need sources when my opinion is infallible. Duh :D

As far as road kill, that's a derogatory stereotype. Unless, of course, you hit it yourself

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, lavender said:

It was after 3 p.m. and I was number 50. Maybe people were going to vote after work. 

Turnout was light in most precincts, unfortunately.  I voted between 3:30 and 4 pm @ TL and was #200.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the Courier, 15% in Elk County, 18% in Clearfield, no figures as yet for Jefferson.


"Any man who can safely drive a car while kissing a pretty girl, simply isn't giving the kiss the attention it deserves"... Albert Einstein

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LFG said:

As a Debate Forum vet, I don't need sources when my opinion is infallible. Duh :D

As far as road kill, that's a derogatory stereotype. Unless, of course, you hit it yourself

Very sorry.  I don't know how it happened, I really don't, but when I hear a southern accent I immediately decrement by 20 the speaker's IQ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Roger Natti said:

Very sorry.  I don't know how it happened, I really don't, but when I hear a southern accent I immediately decrement by 20 the speaker's IQ.

I know that, and I have made the statement in other forums, maybe even here, that I like forums because the accent automatically deducts 50 IQ points. At least you are gracious in your prejudice :thanx:

I'll give an example:

The face to face, phoenetic version of the preceding paragraph would have sounded something like "No s***, I done tolt other Yankees that I like typin' cause talkin' makes me sound stupider than I is. At least you admit yer an azz :censored:"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Jay said:

How do you pronounce water?  We say wah-ter.  I know a southerner who says wooter.

Water,  my neck ain't that red.  Although, I do have relatives who say wawter

Wooter  is also more of a North Carolina thing 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×