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jaman

Brockway District Sports

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5 hours ago, Illiterate said:

It seems most D1 athletes have played multiple sports in high school.  As D1 athletes as typically far superior athletes, they simply do not have to put in the extra time to out-athlete other les-gifted players.  I think you will find most D2 and D3 players also played more than 1 sport.  Even to play on most D2 and D3 college teams, you still have to be a very good athlete.

After the games, a group of us were discussing how many soccer players have gone on to play soccer at any level in college over the last 7 or 8 years. Then of those, which earned significant playing or competed all 4 years.  Mostly we focused on the boys, but we managed to think of a few girls.  The number we came with may be low, simply because we didnt know.  We came up with some from DuBois, Clearfield, and Punxsutawney. Even DCC and, surprisingly, First Baptist has/had a few players play a season or 2 at the college level. ECC has also contributed a few recent players.  Maybe we missed, but we could not think of a single Brockway boy that has played on a college team in the last 6 or 7 years. Most of the players seemed to have only lasted a season or 2, with very few having significant playing time.  (Most colleges keep a very detailed history on their school websites, so was easy to verify a lot of information once you found out the school.)

If I am not mistaken,  Phil Esposito was a talented Brockway soccer player who ultimately played football at Clarion University.  He was the team's kicker.  His sister, Juli, is currently on the women's team at Slippery Rock.  Of this current group of seniors at Brockway,  I see Zane Puhaula and Hunter Allenbaugh going on to play collegiately. 

As to D1 athletes being able to be multi sport athletes,  I both agree and disagree. Shaena Mosch is a great example.  Played basketball at Duke. Prior to signing with Duke also played softball at DCC,  she was strongly encouraged to sit out her senior year of of softball and did so. When I was coaching,  D2 and D3 coaches cared a lot about off season work outs, off season travel leagues and the like. This left the athlete minimal time to be involved in other sports, if they truly wanted to go to college for their chosen sport.  

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1 hour ago, MIM307 said:

If I am not mistaken,  Phil Esposito was a talented Brockway soccer player who ultimately played football at Clarion University.  He was the team's kicker.  His sister, Juli, is currently on the women's team at Slippery Rock.  Of this current group of seniors at Brockway,  I see Zane Puhaula and Hunter Allenbaugh going on to play collegiately. 

As to D1 athletes being able to be multi sport athletes,  I both agree and disagree. Shaena Mosch is a great example.  Played basketball at Duke. Prior to signing with Duke also played softball at DCC,  she was strongly encouraged to sit out her senior year of of softball and did so. When I was coaching,  D2 and D3 coaches cared a lot about off season work outs, off season travel leagues and the like. This left the athlete minimal time to be involved in other sports, if they truly wanted to go to college for their chosen sport.  

Hey, don't forget Jarrett Esposito.  

All college coaches are interested in growth.  Yes, most of them want you to play the sport that you'll be playing at their university.  You get better at the sport by playing it, right?  However, I have never encountered a coach at any level that discouraged an athlete from playing additional sports.  That push usually comes from Mom & Dad.

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59 minutes ago, Cacao said:

Hey, don't forget Jarrett Esposito.  

All college coaches are interested in growth.  Yes, most of them want you to play the sport that you'll be playing at their university.  You get better at the sport by playing it, right?  However, I have never encountered a coach at any level that discouraged an athlete from playing additional sports.  That push usually comes from Mom & Dad.

Thanks for the reminder!!  :)

I agree with you regarding coaches not discouraging kids from participating in other sports.  As I said, earlier I believe it's the early recruitment by college athletes that's contributing to kids "specializing" in one sport.  I also see your point regarding mom/dad encouraging the kid to focus on his/her chosen sport in order to get the college scholarship.  I've seen that a few times over the years.

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20 hours ago, jaman said:

Dubois's Little League and Teener League feeders are always good.  But when the next step comes-nothing.

You can't compare any Little League success to higher men's baseball success such as high school.  Unfortunately, many areas do not have strong LL programs anymore.  Travel ball has taken that over because of the better competition.   Yes, 12 year old little league on TV looks very strong and fun to watch.  DuBois has a nice program up to 12 years old, however when the players hit 13 and up, the competition is garbage.  I believe some of the teams that made the 15-16 year old state tournament this year never had to play a game.  C'mon now, zero games and you're in the state championships?  As for high school, that is a time where you have a lot of the players that left the little league system and rejoin their friends on a team.  These kids that played travel ball most likely played anywhere from 50-100 games a year, where the strictly little league players may have played 20.  There is a big gap at this point and when push comes to shove, the more advanced players play.  Unfortunately, in these days, if a kid doesn't start on a team, he or she quits.  Kids don't understand the meaning of a team or role player, they all want to be a star.  Well sorry buddy, not everyone is a star and not everyone is a D1 athlete.  I can't remember the last time DuBois had a true D1 prospect.  We have had a couple to go some smaller D1 schools, but nothing big.  We can blame the coaches for not teaching the "little things", however if you don't have players that commit and buy into the process, they won't be coachable and will be nothing but a cancer for the program.  I have seen some local teams do really well over the years with coaches that never played the game or knew very little.  Does that make them good coaches?

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23 minutes ago, L8RG8R said:

You can't compare any Little League success to higher men's baseball success such as high school.  Unfortunately, many areas do not have strong LL programs anymore.  Travel ball has taken that over because of the better competition.   Yes, 12 year old little league on TV looks very strong and fun to watch.  DuBois has a nice program up to 12 years old, however when the players hit 13 and up, the competition is garbage.  I believe some of the teams that made the 15-16 year old state tournament this year never had to play a game.  C'mon now, zero games and you're in the state championships?  As for high school, that is a time where you have a lot of the players that left the little league system and rejoin their friends on a team.  These kids that played travel ball most likely played anywhere from 50-100 games a year, where the strictly little league players may have played 20.  There is a big gap at this point and when push comes to shove, the more advanced players play.  Unfortunately, in these days, if a kid doesn't start on a team, he or she quits.  Kids don't understand the meaning of a team or role player, they all want to be a star.  Well sorry buddy, not everyone is a star and not everyone is a D1 athlete.  I can't remember the last time DuBois had a true D1 prospect.  We have had a couple to go some smaller D1 schools, but nothing big.  We can blame the coaches for not teaching the "little things", however if you don't have players that commit and buy into the process, they won't be coachable and will be nothing but a cancer for the program.  I have seen some local teams do really well over the years with coaches that never played the game or knew very little.  Does that make them good coaches?

I saw a baseball player from the  State College this summer who is in 4th grade get invited to play on a travel team that was competing in South Carolina. College coaches have this kid on their radar already.

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43 minutes ago, Keyser Soze said:

I saw a baseball player from the  State College this summer who is in 4th grade get invited to play on a travel team that was competing in South Carolina. College coaches have this kid on their radar already.

Apparently the above scenario is pretty common in college baseball/softball.  NCAA passed recruiting guidelines for softball this past April.  https://nfca.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7784:it-passed-softball-recruiting-contact-date-set-at-september-1-junior-year&catid=284&Itemid=149

Early recruiting was a hot topic at the December 2017 NFCA Convention. DI coaches spent several hours discussing the problem of committing PSAs as young as 6th and 7th grade. Consensus emerged that a clear, bold line rule governing all recruiting contact would slow the process down.

The “lacrosse model” passed last year by the NCAA, which set September 1 of junior year as the start date for all recruiting contact, became the definitive preference of the softball coaches after considering other potential options. Getting something in place as soon as possible was a priority. Lobbying efforts commenced immediately.

At this week’s NCAA DI Council meetings, the Student Athlete Experience Committee (SAEC) proposals 2017-111, 2017-112, 2017-113 were approved, establishing September 1 of junior year as the start date for official visits, unofficial visits and recruiting conversations at camps and clinics for all sports except for football and basketball. Since these SAEC proposals passed, softball’s request to include incoming telephone calls and off-campus visits were voted on and approved as “noncontroversial legislation.” This means that for softball, all recruiting contact will begin September 1, junior year.

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2 hours ago, Keyser Soze said:

I saw a baseball player from the  State College this summer who is in 4th grade get invited to play on a travel team that was competing in South Carolina. College coaches have this kid on their radar already.

D1 athletics is a business.  Coaches are paid to win games, PERIOD.  Anyone who thinks those coaches care about how their players do in the classroom is on another planet.  All the coach cares about is if their player is eligible to compete, after that they could care less.  After they are done using their skills for four years, they most likely could care less what they do. Coaches have to gain some sort of a competitive edge.  It is never too early for them to begin recruiting a player.  If they don't recruit them, somebody else will.  

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3 hours ago, L8RG8R said:

You can't compare any Little League success to higher men's baseball success such as high school.  Unfortunately, many areas do not have strong LL programs anymore.  Travel ball has taken that over because of the better competition.   Yes, 12 year old little league on TV looks very strong and fun to watch.  DuBois has a nice program up to 12 years old, however when the players hit 13 and up, the competition is garbage.  I believe some of the teams that made the 15-16 year old state tournament this year never had to play a game.  C'mon now, zero games and you're in the state championships?  As for high school, that is a time where you have a lot of the players that left the little league system and rejoin their friends on a team.  These kids that played travel ball most likely played anywhere from 50-100 games a year, where the strictly little league players may have played 20.  There is a big gap at this point and when push comes to shove, the more advanced players play.  Unfortunately, in these days, if a kid doesn't start on a team, he or she quits.  Kids don't understand the meaning of a team or role player, they all want to be a star.  Well sorry buddy, not everyone is a star and not everyone is a D1 athlete.  I can't remember the last time DuBois had a true D1 prospect.  We have had a couple to go some smaller D1 schools, but nothing big.  We can blame the coaches for not teaching the "little things", however if you don't have players that commit and buy into the process, they won't be coachable and will be nothing but a cancer for the program.  I have seen some local teams do really well over the years with coaches that never played the game or knew very little.  Does that make them good coaches?

Makes them good motivators at the very least.

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17 hours ago, Illiterate said:

The truth is you can't.  While it might be possible to limit 'non-mandatory' open gyms and workouts that take place on school property, there no way to regulate activities that occur off campus, especially those that do not involve a school coach.

No way to regulate it …...yet

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8 hours ago, Cacao said:

Hey, don't forget Jarrett Esposito.  

All college coaches are interested in growth.  Yes, most of them want you to play the sport that you'll be playing at their university.  You get better at the sport by playing it, right?  However, I have never encountered a coach at any level that discouraged an athlete from playing additional sports.  That push usually comes from Mom & Dad.

well---maybe. I remember slews of athletes would not participate in a certain Spring sport because of off-season conditioning for a Fall sport...….this went on for many years...….

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The Brockway boys soccer team  has only lost 1 regular season game in 4 years also Zane will be going to Lock Haven for his education and will also will be playing soccer he is a 4 sport athlete Hunter is going to play but not sure where  Jake   may be playing also

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9 hours ago, Cacao said:

Hey, don't forget Jarrett Esposito.  

All college coaches are interested in growth.  Yes, most of them want you to play the sport that you'll be playing at their university.  You get better at the sport by playing it, right?  However, I have never encountered a coach at any level that discouraged an athlete from playing additional sports.  That push usually comes from Mom & Dad.

It would be interesting to compile a list of local athletes who have competed at the college level in any division for any sport. D1 players get followed, D2 and D3 barely get coverage.  Quite a few do go on, but, sadly, a majority of them seem to quit after a year or 2 and/or fail to achieve any significant playing time.  I suppose for local we could include DAHS, DCC, and Brockway.

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53 minutes ago, Illiterate said:

It would be interesting to compile a list of local athletes who have competed at the college level in any division for any sport. D1 players get followed, D2 and D3 barely get coverage.  Quite a few do go on, but, sadly, a majority of them seem to quit after a year or 2 and/or fail to achieve any significant playing time.  I suppose for local we could include DAHS, DCC, and Brockway.

How far back?

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On 11/7/2018 at 9:09 AM, jaman said:

I agree totally.  It has always amazed me, especially in the last 20-25 years, how a school Dubois size isnt competitive on a regular basis in all sports..

Are they competitive at the state level in anything ever?

Hate to say it, but being a District 9 champ really isn’t that big of a deal if you go into the state playoffs and lose right away. 

How long has it been since the Beavers won a football playoff game? 25 years or so? That’s sad. 

Now, the way it’s set up, their first round game could be against a very beatable team but they cannot even beat them. No more first games against State College or an Erie team, just Bellefonte or Clearfield pretty much. Their competition level went down about two notches from where it was just a few years ago. 

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3 hours ago, Illiterate said:

It would be interesting to compile a list of local athletes who have competed at the college level in any division for any sport. D1 players get followed, D2 and D3 barely get coverage.  Quite a few do go on, but, sadly, a majority of them seem to quit after a year or 2 and/or fail to achieve any significant playing time.  I suppose for local we could include DAHS, DCC, and Brockway.

I think that you're overestimating the appeal of a "big" D-I school for some sports, especially baseball. For example, of the top 20 MLB draft picks this season, 12 came from either a smaller college or a high school. Some of the ones from this area choose to go to a smaller D-1 school for the expanded playing time on a stage that may give them exposure to players already drawing MLB attention.

There have been a couple over the past several years that gone on to play baseball at St. Bonaventure while the younger Miknis, a senior at DCC, already signed with Kent State.


"Be still, my fingers, be still" - fedup

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1 hour ago, Illiterate said:

7 to 10 years? 

 

Kyle Smith Brockway  Offensive Guard.   D1.   3 year starter. Central Florida.  2005-2007. All Conference 2007. Phil Esposito.  3 years starter. D2 Clarion university.   There were a couple others. That's in the last 10-12 years. I can name the D1-D3 almost all years of the last 50 years from brockway.  And I know a few D1  from Dubois and DCC.

 

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I think there would be more that play NCAA, but feel most coaches are uncertain how to help the athlete achieve that goal.  Not only getting their athlete NCAA attention, but preparing them for what to expect at the next level.  Most athletes don't realize that college's have early morning (5-6am) AND afternoon practices each day.  

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9 hours ago, Vader said:

I think that you're overestimating the appeal of a "big" D-I school for some sports, especially baseball. For example, of the top 20 MLB draft picks this season, 12 came from either a smaller college or a high school. Some of the ones from this area choose to go to a smaller D-1 school for the expanded playing time on a stage that may give them exposure to players already drawing MLB attention.

There have been a couple over the past several years that gone on to play baseball at St. Bonaventure while the younger Miknis, a senior at DCC, already signed with Kent State.

DCC is quietly building a very good, fundamentally sound, baseball program.  Softball program is one of the best, along with Punxsy and DuBois.

 

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On 11/7/2018 at 9:19 AM, Cacao said:

This too has always confused me.  As an outsider looking in, I can only assume that it comes down to preparedness.  Athletes lack proper instruction earlier in their careers and/or lack the discipline/desire to be the best.  Coaches are ill-prepared to instruct proper techniques/scenarios, poor communication skills, and lack adequate focus to detail.  Both athlete and coach need to understand that it's always the small stuff.   

Locally, probably because many are not teachers, tend to be of the seasonal variety.  Teachers have constant access to their players to 'encourage' off season workouts, which amounts to year round practice.  Non-teacher coaches have limited access, which makes a difference.

Unless you have kids attending non-mandatory instruction, coaches have limited time to teach individual instruction.  Therefore, coaches seem to typically exploit/focus on the better athletes and/or focus on getting players to function as a group, with emphasis on basic skills.  You can produce good teams, yet the star players still fail to have learned the fine skills in individual players that are needed to excel at the next level

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