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Wreckage Of WW2 Japanese Aircraft Carrier Sunk In Battle Of Midway Discovered

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Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later

Researchers have discovered the wreck of the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga 77 years after it was sunk by U.S. forces during World War II's Battle of Midway.

Experts aboard the research vessel RV Petrel announced the discovery Friday. After surveying more than 500 square nautical miles, crewmembers identified the wreckage Wednesday at a depth of more than 17,000 feet in the Pacific.

 

RV Petrel is part of Vulcan Inc., a research organization set up by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.

“[The Battle of Midway] was a major carrier-to-carrier battle that left its eerie evidence strewn for thousands of miles across the ocean floor,” Robert Kraft, director of subsea operations for Vulcan, said in a statement. “With each piece of debris and each ship we discover and identify, our intent is to honor history and those who served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for their countries.”

WRECK OF WWII AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASP DISCOVERED IN THE CORAL SEA

Eerie images of the Kaga captured by an undersea drone show a starboard side gun, a 20 cm gun, a gun mount and a barbette, or gun emplacement.

A starboard side gun on the Kaga wreck. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

A starboard side gun on the Kaga wreck. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Kaga is one of four Japanese aircraft carriers that took part in the Battle of Midway, June 4-7, 1942. All four of the carriers, along with the Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma, were sunk in the battle, marking a pivotal victory for the U.S. Navy.

After the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Japan hoped to deal another major blow to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Midway. However, U.S. codebreakers were able to get details of the Japanese plan, and the Navy prepared its own ambush.

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“The Battle of Midway was an American intelligence breakthrough,” Frank Thompson, curator at the Naval History and Heritage Command, said in the statement. “The team that deciphered the Japanese fleet codes enabled Pacific Fleet commander Nimitz to understand Japanese intentions and plan accordingly. This was a true turning point in the war for the U.S. Navy.”

A barbette, or gun emplacement, on the Kaga.

A barbette, or gun emplacement, on the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Petrel crew hopes to find and survey all the wreckage from the entire battle, an effort that could add new details about Midway to history books.

RV Petrel is no stranger to shipwreck discoveries. Earlier this year, for example, experts from the research vessel discovered the wreck of World War II aircraft carrier USS Wasp in the Coral Sea more than 70 years after the ship was sunk during the Guadalcanal campaign.

A gun mount on the wreck of the Kaga.

A gun mount on the wreck of the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc)

Also in 2019, researchers aboard the RV Petrel discovered one of the first Japanese battleships to be sunk by U.S. forces during World War II. Imperial Japanese Navy ship Hiei sank on Nov. 14, 1942, in the Solomon Islands.

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Paul Allen died in October 2018 from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. His research organization has discovered a host of historic military shipwrecks, such as the wrecks of the USS Helena, USS Lexington and USS Juneau.

A 20 cm gun on the Kaga, which sank during the Battle of Midway in 1942. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

A 20 cm gun on the Kaga, which sank during the Battle of Midway in 1942. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

An undersea drone from research vessel RV Petrel captured eerie images of the aircraft carrier on the seabed.

An undersea drone from research vessel RV Petrel captured eerie images of the aircraft carrier on the seabed. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. )

The group’s biggest discovery, however, came in 2017, when Allen and his team found the long-lost wreck of the USS Indianapolis in the Philippine Sea.                                                                                        SEE VIDEO REPORT   ;   https://www.foxnews.com/science/wreck-japanese-aircraft-carrier-discovered-battle-of-midway

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The normal Western accounts of the Battle of Midway, which is a naval battle to rank in the same category as Salamis, Lepanto, Tsushima and Trafalgar, use as a Japanese source accounts written by Fuchida Mitsua,, who was a worshiper of Admiral Yamamoto.  They tend to lay the blame for the battle on the local Japanese commander, Admiral Nagumo to preserve Yamamoto’s reputation.  However recent Western scholarship digging into all the Japanese accounts indicates that Nagumo fought according to specific orders issued by Yamamoto and within the Japanese Navy’s doctrine and tactics.  It was the Yamamoto’s flawed battle plan and the flaws in Japanese doctrine that ought to be studied.  

A book on the subject very much worth the reading is “Shattered Sword” by Tully & Parshall.  


Because, Gentlemen, I don't trust you...  Gunning Bedford, U.S. Constitutional Convention
The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal. Aristotle
First God created idiots.  That was for practice. Then He created school boards. Mark Twain
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. George Santayana

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Battle of Midway: Second World War II-era Japanese carrier apparently found in Pacific

Deep-sea explorers and historians on Sunday announced they apparently found a second World War II-era Japanese aircraft carrier that sank during the Battle of Midway.

A review of sonar data captured Sunday showed either the Japanese carrier Akagi or the Soryu resting in nearly 18,000 feet of water in the Pacific Ocean more than 1,300 miles northwest of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Vulcan Inc. director of undersea operations Rob Kraft said.

 

The researchers used an autonomous underwater vehicle, or AUV, equipped with sonar to find the ship. The vehicle had been out overnight collecting data, and the image of a warship appeared in the first set of readings on Sunday morning.

In this June 4, 1942 file photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS Astoria (CA-34) steamed by USS Yorktown (CV-5), shortly after the carrier had been hit by three Japanese bombs in the Battle of Midway. 

In this June 4, 1942 file photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS Astoria (CA-34) steamed by USS Yorktown (CV-5), shortly after the carrier had been hit by three Japanese bombs in the Battle of Midway.  (U.S. Navy via AP, File)

The crew planned to deploy the AUV for another eight-hour mission where it will capture high-resolution sonar images of the site to measure the ship and confirm its identity, officials said.

GROUP SCOURS PACIFIC FOR SUNKEN WWII BATTLESHIPS, LOST WAR GRAVES

The finding came on the heels of last week’s discovery, another Japanese aircraft carrier, the Kaga, which U.S. forces also sank during the Battle of Midway in June 1942.

Until now, only one of the seven ships that went down in the air-and-sea battle — five Japanese vessels and two American ships — had been found.

The crew of the research vessel Petrel was hoping to find and survey all lost ships from the 1942 Battle of Midway, which historians considered a pivotal fight for the U.S. in the Pacific during WWII.                                                              https://www.foxnews.com/science/warship-wwii-battle-of-midway-pearl-harbor-second-japanese-carrier

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