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Family Of Kentucky EMT Killed By Police Executing Search Warrant Files Lawsuit

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Family of Kentucky EMT shot by police executing search warrant files lawsuit

Fox News Flash top headlines for May 13

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

The family of an EMT who was asleep in her Kentucky apartment when police executed a search warrant the family claims was at the wrong address has filed a lawsuit accusing officers of firing more than 20 shots into Breonna Taylor's home.

 

The 26-year-old aspiring nurse was killed on March 13 after being shot eight times by Louisville police officers.

Her mother, Tamika Palmer, said she filed the lawsuit to get justice for her daughter.

AHMAUD ARBERY'S MOTHER SAYS GEORGIA OFFICIALS WOULD HAVE 'COVERED UP' SON'S MURDER 

"I want them to say her name," she told The Washington Post. "There's no reason Breonna should be dead at all."

The lawsuit, filed late last month, accuses the officers of wrongful death, excessive force and gross negligence.

According to court documents, the officers executed a drug warrant at Taylor's home, searching for a male suspect who didn't live in her apartment complex and had already been detained by authorities when the police officers stormed in.

 

Family Photo

Family Photo

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, was also inside the apartment and shot at officers when they attempted to enter without announcing who they were and why they were there.

 

The lawsuit claims more than 20 rounds were fired into Taylor's apartment.

None of the police officers involved have been charged in connection with the shooting.

Walker, a licensed gun owner who was not injured in the shooting, was arrested and faces charges of first-degree assault and attempted murder of a police officer.

His defense attorney said in court filings that Walker fired in self-defense because he thought the officers were trying to break in.

Palmer said she first heard about the incident after getting a frantic call from Walker who said he thought Taylor had been shot. When she arrived at the scene, the officers there had given her very little information and asked whether her daughter had any enemies or if she and Walker were having problems, Palmer said.

Palmer said she worried about Taylor's health during the coronavirus outbreak because she was a first responder.

"She was an essential worker. She had to go to work," Palmer said. "She didn't have a problem with that. ... To not be able to sleep in her own bed without someone busting down her door and taking her life. ... I was just like, 'Make sure you wash your hands!'"

On Monday, Taylor's family hired prominent civil rights and personal injury attorney Ben Crump.

Crump has represented the families of other high-profile black shooting victims including Trayvon Martin and, more recently, Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot while jogging down a residential street in Georgia.

When asked about the shooting, Louisville Metro Police Department spokeswoman Jessie Halladay told Fox News that she was prohibited from commenting on an ongoing internal investigation.                                                                                                                                                                                                 https://www.foxnews.com/us/family-of-emt-shot-by-police-files-lawsuit

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Louisville bans 'no-knocks' after Breonna Taylor's death


by DYLAN LOVAN, Associated Press

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Breonna Taylor's name is seen on a window on UM's campus as a peaceful protest walks past in Ann Arbor, Mich. on Tuesday, June 2, 2020. (Jenna Kieser/Ann Arbor News via AP)
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Louisville, Kentucky, has banned the use of controversial “no-knock” warrants and named the new ordinance for Breonna Taylor, who was fatally shot by officers who burst into her home.

The city's Metro Council unanimously voted Thursday night to ban the controversial warrants after days of protests and calls for reform. Taylor, who was studying to become a nurse, was shot eight times by officers conducting a narcotics investigation on March 13. No drugs were found at her home.

“I'm just going to say, Breonna, that's all she wanted to do was save lives, so with this law she will continue to get to do that,” Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, said after the law was passed. “She would be so happy.”

 

 

Bre, this is for you! 🙏🏾 #BreonnasLaw not only BANS no-knock warrants in Louisville, but also requires the use of body cameras by anyone executing a search warrant. Thank you all for your support in advocating for justice!! Let this be part of #BreonnaTaylor’s legacy. #SayHerName

 
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The law bans the use of the warrants by Louisville Metro officers. Police typically use them in drug cases over concern that evidence could be destroyed if they announce their arrival. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul also introduced federal legislation Thursday that would ban the use of no-knock warrants nationwide.

Louisville council member Jessica Green, who co-wrote the city's new law, said the city's police typically use the no-knock warrants about 20 to 25 times a year.

“No-knock warrants are not tools that officers have to use with any regularity to get their job done,” Green said.

Green was also critical of an incident report in the Taylor shooting released by Louisville Police this week.

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Kevin Peterson, founder and executive director of The New Democracy Coalition, center, displays a placard showing fallen Breonna Taylor as he addresses a rally, Tuesday, June 9, 2020, in Boston. Petersen advocates for changing the name of Faneuil Hall, as its namesake Peter Faneuil, was a slave owner. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The report released three months after the shooting is mostly blank, with few details of the incident and some incorrect entries.

It cites a police-involved death investigation and identifies Taylor, 26, as the victim. It also has a box to check for forced entry, which was checked “No,” and it also said “none” in a space for the victim's injuries.

Green said Taylor would “never be forgotten, she will never be erased, no matter what an incident report said.”

Louisville police did give more details about the shooting in a media briefing held on March 13, hours after the shooting. Officials said the officers knocked, announced themselves and then forced their way into Taylor's apartment, where they were met with gunfire.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer called the released report “unacceptable.”

 

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I plan to sign Breonna’s Law as soon as it hits my desk. I suspended use of these warrants indefinitely last month, and wholeheartedly agree with Council that the risk to residents and officers with this kind of search outweigh any benefit. 1/2

 

This is one of many critical steps on police reform that we’ve taken to create a more peaceful, just, compassionate and equitable community. 2/2

“It’s issues like this that erode public confidence in LMPD’s ability to do its job, and that’s why I’ve ordered an external top-to-bottom review of the department,” he said in an emailed statement. “I am sorry for the additional pain to the Taylor family and our community.”

The three officers involved in the shooting, Jon Mattingly, Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove, have been placed on administrative reassignment while the shooting is investigated. This week the detective who requested the no-knock warrant, Joshua Jaynes, also was reassigned.

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, was also in the home that night and fired at police. Walker was initially charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but that charge was dropped by prosecutors in May. Walker told police he didn't know who was coming into the home and that he thought he was acting in self-defense. Mattingly was shot in the thigh and recovered.

The release of Walker's 911 call on May 28 marked the beginning of days of protests in Louisville, fueled by Taylor's death and the death of a black man in police custody in Minneapolis, George Floyd.                                                                                                                SEE TWEET VIDEO     ;    https://wjactv.com/news/nation-world/louisville-bans-no-knocks-after-breonna-taylors-death

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Officer involved in Breonna Taylor shooting to be fired

by: Bill Shannon

Posted:  / Updated: 
Breonna-Taylor-05132020.jpg?w=650&h=370&

An undated courtesy photo of Breonna Taylor

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Louisville’s mayor said Friday that one of three police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor will be fired.

Mayor Greg Fisher said interim Louisville police Chief Robert Schroeder has started termination proceedings for Officer Brett Hankison. Two other officers remain on administrative reassignment while the shooting is investigated.

Fischer said officials could not answer questions about the firing because of state law. He referred all questions to the Jefferson County attorney’s office.

Taylor, who was black, was gunned down by officers who burst into her Louisville home using a no-knock warrant. She was shot eight times by officers conducting a narcotics investigation on March 13. No drugs were found at her home.

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Louisville detective fired over killing of Breonna Taylor

“I find your conduct a shock to the conscience," the police chief wrote in a termination letter to Louisville detective Brett Hankison.
 
 
 
 / Source: NBC News
By Tim Stelloh

One of three Kentucky police officers involved in the killing of Breonna Taylor earlier this year was fired Tuesday, authorities said.

Image: US-POLICE-CRIME-RACISM Breonna Taylor during a graduation ceremony in Louisville, Ky.Courtesy of Family of Breonna Taylor / AFP - Getty Images

In a two-page letter to Louisville Metro Police Department detective Brett Hankison, chief Robert J. Schroeder said that Hankison violated the department’s regulations and deadly force standards.

“Based upon my review, these are extreme violations of our policies,” he wrote. “I find your conduct a shock to the conscience.”

Louisville police officer Brett Hankison. Louisville police officer Brett Hankison.Louisville Metro Police Department

Taylor, 26, an African American emergency-room technician, was killed by police March 13 after three plainclothes officers used a "no-knock" warrant to enter her apartment around 12:40 a.m. as part of a drug investigation.

The case has drawn widespread criticism and national protests. Two other officers are on administrative reassignment while the shooting is investigated.

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Louisville's top cops refuse to answer questions on Breonna Taylor case

They walked out of a committee hearing on Monday, refusing to answer questions.

August 4, 2020, 10:42 AM
5 min read

Louisville's top police officers walked out of a committee hearing on Monday, refusing to answer questions amid an ongoing investigation into the city's handling of the case of Breonna Taylor, a young Black medical worker who was fatally shot by plainclothes officers.

Louisville Metro Police Chief Rob Schroeder and the city's chief of public safety Amy Hess left the hearing without answering queries from city lawmakers on Monday, citing a pending lawsuit against the police department and the city.

The officials had agreed to testify before the Government Oversight and Audit Committee about the city's response to ongoing protests over Taylor's death.

It was the first scheduled hearing related to the Metro Council's investigation into Mayor Greg Fischer's administration and its handling of the large-scale protests that followed the 26-year-old woman's death.

Attorneys for Schroeder and Hess argued that they couldn't answer the questions due to a federal lawsuit filed Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky and the NAACP. It names Schroeder, Mayor Fischer, Louisville metro government and the police department among the defendants.

"If we're compelled to proceed today and we're here voluntarily and prepared to proceed, the law requires it be done in closed session," David Gaurnieri, an attorney for Hess, said.

Schroeder's attorney, Joey Klausing, made a similar argument, saying a testimony in open court this early on in the case could jeopardize the officers' defense.

"He [Schroeder] has been named in a 47-page civil rights lawsuit, which I haven't even had the opportunity to talk to him about," Klausing said, noting that the suit came in late Thursday night. "He's not just been named in his official capacity. He's been named in his individual capacity as well."

"To have him be compelled to testify here today would be in contradiction to the statutes that have been promulgated by our legislature," he added.

The four-hour hearing was supposed to focus on how the police department handled protests in the wake of Taylor's death in March, but the attorneys claimed there was too much overlap between the topics on the hearing agenda and those mentioned in the excessive use of force lawsuit.

After their departure, council members voted 10-1 to issue subpoenas to compel the officials to testify.

Taylor's death on March 13 sent shock waves around the country. Louisville police officers had executed a no-knock search warrant and used a battering ram to forcefully enter the young woman's apartment.

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, got out of bed around midnight when they heard a commotion outside. After a short exchange with police, Walker fired his gun in self-defense, saying he thought his home was being broken into, according to police.

The plainclothes officers returned gunfire, firing several shots and fatally hitting Taylor, police said.

It was later revealed that the police had been looking for two men who they believed were selling drugs out of a house located near Taylor’s home. Police obtained a no-knock warrant to search Taylor’s apartment because they had reason to believe the men had used her apartment to receive packages.

One of the officers, Brett Hankison, was fired in June amid intense pressure from the public. Jon Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove, the other officers involved, were placed on administrative reassignment, but civil rights activists say all three men should be charged.                                                                                                                                                 https://abcnews.go.com/US/louisvilles-top-cops-refuse-answer-questions-breonna-taylor/story?id=72165319&cid=clicksource_4380645_7_heads_posts_card_hed

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Multi-million settlement reached in Breonna Taylor lawsuit


by DYLAN LOVAN, The Associated Press

This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor  in Louisville, Ky. (Photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP)
This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky. (Photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP)
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The city of Louisville will pay millions to the mother of Breonna Taylor and reform police practices as part of a lawsuit settlement months after Taylor's slaying by police thrust the Black woman's name to the forefront of a national reckoning on race.

A person who has seen the settlement told The Associated Press it is the largest sum paid by the city for a police misconduct case. The source asked not to be identified because the settlement has not been announced publicly.

Taylor's death sparked months of protests in Louisville and calls nationwide for the officers to be criminally charged. The state's attorney general, Daniel Cameron, is investigating police actions in the March 13 fatal shooting.

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FILE - Tamika Palmer, mother of Breonna Taylor, addresses the media in Louisville, Ky., on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, FIle)

The lawsuit, filed in April by Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, alleged the police used flawed information when they obtained a “no-knock” warrant to enter the 26-year-old woman's apartment in March. Taylor and her boyfriend were roused from bed by police, and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, has said he fired once at the officers thinking it was an intruder. Investigators say police were returning fire when they shot Taylor several times. No drugs were found at her home.

Palmer has said she is trying to be patient about the results of Cameron's criminal investigation and the long wait, which is now six months since her daughter's death.

In that time, her daughter's slaying — along with George Floyd and others — has become a rallying cry for protesters seeking a reckoning on racial justice and police reform. High-profile celebrities like Oprah Winfrey and LeBron James have called for the officers to be charged in Taylor's death.

Palmer's lawsuit accused three Louisville police officers of blindly firing into Taylor’s apartment the night of the March raid, striking Taylor several times. One of the officers, Jonathan Mattingly, went into the home after the door was broken down and was struck in the leg by the gunshot from Walker.

The warrant was one of five issued in a wide-ranging investigation of a drug trafficking suspect who was a former boyfriend of Taylor's. That man, Jamarcus Glover, was arrested at a different location about 10 miles (16 kilometers) away from Taylor's apartment on the same evening.

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FILE - In this July 6, 2020, file photo a ground mural depicting a portrait of Breonna Taylor is seen at Chambers Park, Monday, July 6, 2020, in Annapolis, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

The settlement includes reforms on how warrants are handled by police. The city of Louisville is expected to announce the details Tuesday afternoon.

The city has already taken some reform measures, including passing a law named for Taylor that bans the use of the no-knock warrants. Police typically use them in drug cases over concern that evidence could be destroyed if they announce their arrival.

Mayor Greg Fischer fired former police chief Steve Conrad in June and last week named Yvette Gentry, a former deputy chief, as the new interim police chief. Gentry would be the first Black woman to lead the force of about 1,200 sworn officers. The department has also fired Brett Hankison, one of the three officers who fired shots at Taylor's apartment that night. Hankison is appealing the dismissal.

The largest settlement previously paid in a Louisville police misconduct case was $8.5 million in 2012, to a man who spent nine years in prison for a crime he did not commit, according to news reports.                                                                                                                       https://wjactv.com/news/nation-world/city-to-pay-millions-to-breonna-taylors-mom-reform-police

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24 minutes ago, MIM307 said:

How much is your kid's life worth? 

 

Life no matter what the circumstance, shouldnt  be quantified in monetary terms.  Any life is priceless. Money demeans life. MY family is priceless and will not return any  lost  life.  If there is a settlement it should be confidential  and not paraded in public. 

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Just now, jaman said:

Life no matter what the circumstance, shouldnt  be quantified in monetary terms.  Any life is priceless. Money demeans life. MY family is priceless and will not return any  lost  life.

Do you think the police procedure reforms that were part of this lawsuit might save your child's, or mine's, life?  Pretty sure that's the bigger picture here.

But feel free to carry on with snarky comments about one life while preaching about the sanctity of your family's life. 

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4 minutes ago, MIM307 said:

Do you think the police procedure reforms that were part of this lawsuit might save your child's, or mine's, life?  Pretty sure that's the bigger picture here.

But feel free to carry on with snarky comments about one life while preaching about the sanctity of your family's life. 

 

29 minutes ago, MIM307 said:

How much is your kid's life worth? 

 

So your Children arent priceless?( And that's not snarky) I consider all children priceless.  

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3 minutes ago, jaman said:

 

So your Children arent priceless?( And that's not snarky) I consider all children priceless.  

Where did I say my children aren't priceless? 

Where did I make a snarky comment about the amount of money a grieving family is receiving?

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5 hours ago, MIM307 said:

Do you think the police procedure reforms that were part of this lawsuit might save your child's, or mine's, life?  Pretty sure that's the bigger picture here.

But feel free to carry on with snarky comments about one life while preaching about the sanctity of your family's life. 

I think you missed the point of jaman's post.  Any procedure reforms were buried because of the money. The monetary amount stands out to people. That is what made the headlines.  The monetary amount should have been withheld and any reforms should have taken precedence in the headlines.  Of course the media is just around to sensationalize tragedies anymore and their headlines basically amount to " xxx sued xxx for $xx.xx.  This is what life is worth"  Instead it should be "xxx sues xxx for reforms in procedure to prevent this from happening to another family.

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11 hours ago, allboys said:

I think you missed the point of jaman's post.  Any procedure reforms were buried because of the money. The monetary amount stands out to people. That is what made the headlines.  The monetary amount should have been withheld and any reforms should have taken precedence in the headlines.  Of course the media is just around to sensationalize tragedies anymore and their headlines basically amount to " xxx sued xxx for $xx.xx.  This is what life is worth"  Instead it should be "xxx sues xxx for reforms in procedure to prevent this from happening to another family.

I didn't miss the point.  I read the article, not just the headline.  Jaman's post was snarky and I stand by my comments on it. 

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27 minutes ago, MIM307 said:

I didn't miss the point.  I read the article, not just the headline.  Jaman's post was snarky and I stand by my comments on it. 

You completely missed the point.  I read all of the articles. All of them led with "multi-million dollar settlement".  The reforms took a back seat and were at the end of every article when it should have been the lead at the beginning.  Money talks. Money sells.  What would have said the most to me...if the family got ZERO money and the multi-million went directly towards effecting change through improved training.

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28 minutes ago, allboys said:

You completely missed the point.  I read all of the articles. All of them led with "multi-million dollar settlement".  The reforms took a back seat and were at the end of every article when it should have been the lead at the beginning.  Money talks. Money sells.  What would have said the most to me...if the family got ZERO money and the multi-million went directly towards effecting change through improved training.

Just because I don't agree with you doesn't mean I have missed the point.  I don't agree with YOUR point but I fully understand the point. 

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