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mr.d

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  1. Sex Offender Arrested for Failing to Comply with Megan’s Law Rules April 22, 2019 12:22 am· Author: Aly Delp JENKS TWP., Pa. (EYT) – A Marienville man is behind bars for failing to comply with Megan’s Law offender requirements. Marienville-based State Police reported receiving a phone call regarding a registered Megan’s Law offender around 9:28 a.m. on Saturday, April 20. Police say upon investigation, 50-year-old Richard Peterson, of Marienville, was taken into custody for failure to comply with Megan’s Law requirements. According to court documents, Peterson pleaded guilty to one first-degree felony count of Rape Forcible Compulsion in 1994. He was sentenced to five to ten years in state prison and is a lifetime Megan’s Law registrant. Court documents indicate Peterson was arraigned in front of Magisterial District Judge Laura S. Bauer at 8:15 p.m. on Saturday, April 20, on one first-degree felony count of failure to provide accurate registration info. Unable to post $50,000.00 monetary bail, he was lodged in the Warren County Jail. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 23, with Judge Bauer presiding. https://www.explorejeffersonpa.com/sex-offender-arrested-for-failing-to-comply-with-megans-law-rules/
  2. Population Decline Continues to Trouble Local Region April 22, 2019 12:45 am· Author: Aly Delp JEFFERSON CO., Pa. (EYT) – While the state of Pennsylvania has seen some increase in population in recent years, locally the numbers continue to decline. (Jefferson County Courthouse. Courtesy of Kyle Yates Photography.) According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, every county in the western part of Pennsylvania, excepting Butler County, has seen continuous declines in population over the last eight years. Jefferson County’s population has gone from 45,244 residents in 2010 to 44,258 residents in 2017, a loss of 2.2 percent. The problem certainly isn’t confined to Jefferson County, either. Clarion County’s population has gone from 40,290 residents in 2010 down to 38,747 residents in 2017, a decline of about 3.8 percent. “I think it’s really an issue everywhere,” Clarion County Commissioner Ted Tharan told exploreClarion.com. “Families are smaller. People are waiting longer to start having kids, and instead of four or five, they’re just having two. We also have an older population and every day you see three to five obituaries in the paper, but I don’t think we’re having that many births, so it’s a natural decline. We’re also having a lot of young people moving to the cities.” Likewise, Indiana County went from 88,745 residents in 2010 down to 86,551 residents in 2017, a 2.5 percent loss, and Clearfield County, which fared somewhat better, still saw a 1.9 percent decline, going from 82,131 residents in 2010 to 80,539 in 2017. While the problem can be contributed to a combination of an aging population and migration to more urban population centers, the same decline is not seen in the more eastern reaches of the state, where continued increases in population helped the state’s overall population grow from 12,709,630 in 2010 to 12,805,537 in 2017, a 12 percent growth in the overall population. Nevertheless, with more of the eastern part of the state considered urban and suburban area, the difference in demographics is not surprising. “It’s the cities that attract the younger people,” noted Tharan. “There will always be problems down the road. “I don’t think we’ll have enough workers in the area and we already have a shortage of people to fill jobs now. Every business seems to have out a help wanted sign.”
  3. Sunday - Ham, turkey, scallop potatoes, coleslaw, baked beans, hot home made rolls, crème brulee, triple chocolate cake, Mtn Dew.
  4. Colorado to stop hassling kids over lemonade stands in time for summer By Connor BoyackPublished April 19, 2019OpinionFOXBusiness Google’s youngest employee shares her top three tips to success At age 19, Falon Fatemi was Google's youngest employee. Now CEO and Founder of Node, Fatemi shares her top three tips to stand out in your job to become successful. The Colorado governor signed a bill into law this month that will allow children to operate a lemonade stand Opens a New Window. without a permit Opens a New Window. . You didn’t know they needed a permit? Yes, before this law they did in the Centennial State; and in most states they still do. Continue Reading Below This legislative victory is a good step forward — or backward, restoring common sense that has been lost amid the hyper-regulation modern society has embraced. Last summer, Jennifer Knowles helped her young sons set up a lemonade stand on a hot day in Denver. Her children's entrepreneurial endeavor was soon shut down for failure to obtain a $125 permit. This summer they can open up shop without any fear of being shut down. When will other states follow suit? A summertime staple of American childhood shouldn’t be a criminal act. One should not need permission from the government to sell lemonade to one’s neighbors. Paying the fee to obtain the requisite permission slip merely perpetuates the problem. Colorado, Utah best states for young entreprene /* COMMON DEFAULT & MOBILE STYLES */ #foxbusiness_mid_article_sponsor, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading_link, .foxbusiness_mid_article_caption, #foxbusiness_mid_article_cta { border-bottom: none; color: #000; display: block; font-family: Source Sans Pro; font-size: .95rem; -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 1.3; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-rendering: optimizeLegibility; width: 100%; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading_link, #foxbusiness_mid_article_cta { font-family: Source Sans Pro; font-weight: 700; } #foxbusiness_mid_article_sponsor, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading, #foxbusiness_mid_article_cta { text-transform: capitalize; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading_link, .foxbusiness_mid_article_caption { margin: .75% 0; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container { margin: 0 auto; padding: 0; width: 100%; } /* 1st BREAK POINT; 2COLUMN LAYOUT; MOBILE LANDSCAPE */ @media (min-width: 530px) { #foxbusiness_mid_article_cta { margin: .75rem 0 0 !important; padding: .35rem 0 .45rem !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article { padding: .25% !important; min-height: 150px !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container_left, .foxbusiness_mid_article_image { position: absolute !important; top: 50% !important; transform: translateY(-50%) !important; -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%) !important; -moz-transform: translateY(-50%) !important; -o-transform: translateY(-50%) !important; -ms-transform: translateY(-50%) !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container_left { float: left !important; height: 150px !important; width: 48%; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_image { max-height: 150px !important; right: 0 !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container_right { float: right !important; width: 48% !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_textcontent { float: left !important; padding: 10% 0 !important; width: 92% !important; } } /* TABLET & DESKTOP */ @media (min-width: 1025px) { .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading, .foxbusiness_mid_article_heading_link, .foxbusiness_mid_article_caption { margin: .25rem 0 !important; } #foxbusiness_mid_article_cta { margin: .75rem 0 0 !important; padding: .5rem 0 !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article { margin: 1rem auto !important; padding: .1rem !important; min-height: 200px !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container_left { height: 169px; width: 300px; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_container_right { padding: 0 !important; width: 57% !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_image { max-height: 200px !important; } .foxbusiness_mid_article_textcontent { padding: 32px 0; width: 100%; } } Colorado joins Utah as the second state to address the issue. Two years ago, the Utah legislature passed a broad law that exempts minors from obtaining permits and licenses for their occasionally operated business. Libertas Institute, the state’s free market think tank, proposed the legislation after seeing stories of young entrepreneurs being hassled by busybody bureaucrats. The new laws in Utah and Colorado cover not only lemonade stands, but every minor-operated business, such as mowing lawns, babysitting and more. Technically, these common teenage enterprises are similarly subject to business licensing laws, yet there is widespread noncompliance countrywide. That doesn’t change the fact, of course, that these children are actually in violation of the law. These laws are what lead to absurd headlines such as "New York state shuts down child's lemonade stand" Opens a New Window. and "Rhode Island police shut down kids' lemonade stand, citing city ordinance concerning commercial vendors." Opens a New Window. The Knowles family certainly isn’t alone; dozens of other stories have received national attention in recent years. Earlier this year, a young boy was busted in Missouri for the crime of shoveling someone’s snow Opens a New Window. without a permit. Drawing the line The lemonade stand shutdowns are what catch people’s attention the most. In one such story, four-year-old Abigail Krutsinger was selling lemonade to passersby in her small city in Iowa in 2011. A cup ran 25 cents, and pretty soon she had made five dollars—not bad for a girl her age. Then the police arrived and shut her down. The city demanded a staggering $400 to bring Abigail’s enterprise into compliance with the law. Her dad’s comment to reporters was prescient: “If the line is drawn to the point where a 4-year-old... can’t sell a couple glasses of lemonade for 25 cents, then I think the line has been drawn at the wrong spot.” The default experience with youth entrepreneurship should not be violation of the law. Few children or their parents think about having to obtain a permission slip to do something as simple as selling treats on the sidewalk; it’s not a factor one typically thinks about when imagining up how to earn a few dollars on a Saturday afternoon. And yet, in the so-called land of the free, local governments demand their pound of flesh—whether it be that of an adult or a minor. It doesn’t have to be this way—and we don’t need to be perpetually outraged by these never-ending stories. Whether at a state or city level, elected officials can put a stop to the madness by doing what Colorado and Utah have done—exempting minors from having to obtain a permit or license when occasionally operating a business. Let’s be clear: we don’t see headlines of foodborne illness outbreaks arising from young entrepreneurs and their roadside offerings. There aren’t any problems with tainted lemonade contaminating the countryside. The only news coverage we see is the failure of little children to pay for a piece of paper from the bureaucracy. Opens a New Window. We should question, then, why such hoops are necessary for little children looking to learn the basics of business. Let’s instead clear the obstacles that stand in their way, and allow them to experience American entrepreneurialism at its best—without first having to kiss the ring of local government. SEE VIDEO REPORT ; https://www.foxbusiness.com/small-business/colorado-legalize-lemonade-stands-young-entrepreneurs-summer-jobs
  5. FDA approves first generic naloxone nasal spray by NBC Friday, April 19th 2019 AA The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first generic nasal spray to reverse opioid overdoses. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first generic nasal spray to reverse opioid overdoses. Generic naloxone has been available for years in an injectable form in a health care setting, but this is the first generic nasal spray, and anyone can use it -- even without training. It can be used on both adults and children by spraying it into one nostril while the person is lying on his or her back. The FDA says the spray can be repeated if necessary. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 130 Americans die every day from overdoses involving opioid drugs. SEE VIDEO REPORT ; https://wjactv.com/news/local/fda-approves-1st-generic-naloxone-nasal-spray
  6. mr.d

    Easter

    Happy Easter to you and family also to everyone else on GoDuBois.
  7. Nascar Published 1 day ago NASCAR will test future Gen-7 car tech at all-star race By Gary Gastelu | Fox News Video NASCAR changes rules after embarrassing qualifying fiasco Due to a recent incident at the Auto Club 400 event on March 17 where none of the final cars in a race set an official time, NASCAR has changed its qualifying rules in order to prevent a similar outcome. NASCAR has decided that all cars must now post a lap time in the last session or start at the rear of the field. Once a car leaves its pit stall it cannot stop on pit road. NASCAR will be giving fans a sneak peek into its future at this year’s all-star race at Charlotte Motor Speedway by modifying the cars with two features that may be incorporated into the all-new Gen-7 models currently under development for 2021. NASCAR often uses the non-points event to test out new rules before incorporating them into the series. Cars go through a tech inspection before every race. (Getty Images) This time around, the Cup cars will be equipped with a single-piece front splitter and radiator pan combination designed to tweak the aerodynamics to make them more consistent to drive in traffic, along with a radiator vent exiting the hood that is aimed at creating downforce parity across all of the vehicles and improving engine cooling. The changes will be incorporated into the 2019 aero package for the All-Star race. (NASCAR) HERE'S WHY NASCAR BRISTOL RACE HAD SO MANY SEATS Many high performance sports cars, including the Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 and upcoming 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 feature vents that reduce pressure under the hood, which helps reduce lift and drag. One of the goals for Gen-7 cars is to make them more relevant to the production models they are based on. The proposed hood vent is similar to the ones used on high performance production cars, like the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500. (Ford) The May 18 race will again have four stages, with a five-lap increase in the final stage from last year. The stages will be 30, 20, 20 and 15 laps. Both green- and yellow-flag laps will count in Stages 1-3, with only green-flag laps counting in the final stage. SEE VIDEO ; https://www.foxnews.com/auto/nascar-will-test-future-gen-7-car-tech-at-all-star-race
  8. Bethlehem Women Accused of Stealing Charity Raffle Item Saturday, April 20, 2019 @ 12:04 AM Posted by Aly Delp NEW BETHLEHEM BOROUGH, Pa. (EYT) – Two New Bethlehem women are facing charges after they allegedly stole a basketball from a charity raffle display. According to court documents, the New Bethlehem Borough Police Department filed criminal charges against 24-year-old Cassandra Irene Smith and 27-year-old Sarah Laurene Lowers. The charges stem from a theft that occurred around 2:07 p.m. on Friday, April 5, in New Bethlehem Borough. According to a criminal complaint, Officer Airgood, of the New Bethlehem Borough Police Department, received a call around 3:55 p.m. on April 5 regarding a theft from a grocery store in New Bethlehem. A store employee reported that video surveillance clearly showed two white females, one with blond hair and one with brown hair, steal a basketball on display for a raffle for charity. The video footage revealed the women, who were shopping with a small child, take the basketball out of the package and place it on the rack under their shopping cart before leaving the store, according to the complaint. Sargeant Clark, of the New Bethlehem Police Department, was able to positively identify the women in the video as Cassandra Smith and Sarah Lowers. Sargeant Clark interviewed the women on April 16. According to the complaint, the women both confessed to taking the basketball, and Sargeant Clark was able to recover it; however, the complaint notes they had put both names on it, and the item is no longer suitable to be raffled. On April 16, both women returned to the grocery store, and Smith “admitted to taking the ball and apologized for the incident,” the complaint indicates. Based on the investigation, the following charges were filed against both Lowers and Smith on Thursday, April 18: – Theft by Unlawful Taking-Movable Property, Misdemeanor 3 – Receiving Stolen Property, Misdemeanor 3 Preliminary arraignments for both women are scheduled at 10:15 a.m. on Thursday, May 2, with Magisterial District Judge Jeffrey C. Miller presiding. http://www.exploreclarion.com/2019/04/20/new-bethlehem-women-accused-of-stealing-charity-raffle-item/
  9. Trio Accused of Passing Counterfeit Bills at Punxsy Walmart Arrested in Erie April 20, 2019 12:30 am· Author: Tyler Ochs PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. (EYT) – Three suspects accused of passing counterfeit currency at Walmart in Punxsutawney have been apprehended. Punxsutawney-based State Police responded to the Walmart Supercenter along State Route 119 on December 11, 2018, after receiving a report of counterfeit currency being used by three suspects who were traveling in a Honda Accord. According to a release issued on April 19, the suspects were arrested in Erie, Pa. for similar crimes, according to police. Their names have not been released. The case remains under investigation.
  10. Boy injured in Mall of America fall is 'showing real signs of recovery' According to authorities, suspect Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda flung the boy over a railing after choosing him at random. The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota on Oct. 14, 2018.Raymond Boyd / Getty Images file April 20, 2019, 10:59 AM EDT By Safia Samee Ali The family of a 5-year old boy who was thrown off a third-floor balcony by a man at the Mall of America last Friday say their son is "showing real signs of recovery," despite remaining in intensive care for over a week. "We have good news to share with you on this good Friday. Our miracle child is showing real signs of recovery. New test results have been positive, though he remains in intensive care with a long road ahead. Our faith in God and our Savior Jesus remains strong and we are gaining more reason for optimism day by day. We continue our appeal for privacy as we focus on our son, and thank you for respecting our wishes. Just know that we absolutely feel your overwhelming love, prayers and support, for they seem to be working. Thank you so much, from the bottom of our hearts," said attorney Stephen Tillitt, on behalf of the boy's family. According to authorities, suspect Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda, 24, flung the boy over a railing, dropping him nearly 40 feet, after choosing him at random because he was "looking to kill someone" at the mall. Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda.Bloomington Police Department He said he had planned to kill an adult standing near the railing, but picked the young victim instead, according to the criminal complaint. The boy, identified as Landon, suffered severe head trauma and several broken bones as a result of the intense fall. Witnesses told officers Aranda took off running after either pushing or throwing the child, Bloomington Police Chief Jeff Potts said. Potts said that a witness tried to stop him from fleeing and that officers then "quickly" found him in the mall and took him into custody. Aranda told police that he began to "lash out" after being frequently rejected by women he tried to talk to at the mall, according to the complaint. Aranda was charged with attempted murder last week and remains in custody on a $2 million bond. Online donations totaling nearly $1 million have been raised towards the boy's medical expenses. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/boy-injured-mall-america-fall-showing-real-signs-recovery-n996686
  11. April 19, 2019 SEE SLIDES OF TRADITIONS ------ https://www.wtae.com/article/history-easter-traditions/19634951
  12. 14-year-old girls facing felony charges in alleged plot to kidnap and kill 9 1 hr ago © WFTS Two 14-year-old girls enrolled at Avon Park Middle School in Avon Park, Fla., were arrested for an alleged school shooting plot on Friday, April 19, 2019. A pair of 14-year-old Florida middle school girls are facing felony charges for conspiracy to commit kidnapping and murder after being arrested this week in what authorities described as a plot to kidnap and kill 9 people. Court records reviewed by ABC News Tampa affiliate WFTS indicate that a teacher told police she observed the girls acting “hysterical” while searching for a folder at school, and heard one say that “I’m just going to tell them it’s a prank if they call me or if they find it.” ABC News is withholding the identity of the girls due to their age. The teacher located the folder, which allegedly contained eight handwritten notes detailing the kidnapping and murder plot, and notified authorities, according to WFTS. The letters outlined plans to obtain guns and discussed the transportation and disposal of bodies. One contained plans about what the two youngsters would wear during the kidnappings and murders. The folder was labeled “Private info,” “Do not open” and “Project 11/9,” according to the TV station. The teenagers were taken into custody and each face nine counts of criminal attempt to conspire capital felony (premeditated homicide), and three counts of criminal attempt to conspire third-degree felony (kidnapping), WFTS reported. Officials said they are treating the plot seriously. "It doesn’t matter if they thought it was a joke,” Highlands County Sheriff's Office (HCSO) spokesman Scott Dressel told WFTS. “It's not a joke. There's no joking about something like this. You don’t make a joke about killing people. It's not a joke.” Highlands County Schools Deputy Superintendent Andrew Lethbridge said in a statement to WFTS that the school’s safety protocols were effective. “We would like to remind students (and everyone) that we are all held accountable for the information that we communicate,” he said in the statement. “The [district] takes threats very seriously and we work closely with the HCSO to investigate them. We have stressed the concept that if staff or students hear or see something that concerns them, to please share that information with someone that can do something about it. In this situation, we witnessed this concept in action. This enables us to be proactive and respond to situations prior to an incident taking place." http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/14-year-old-girls-facing-felony-charges-in-alleged-plot-to-kidnap-and-kill-9/ar-BBW7g7u?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=HPCDHP
  13. CRIME Published 7 hours ago Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life By BRIAN MELLEY | Associated Press Louise Turpin sits in a courtroom during a sentencing hearing Friday, April 19, 2019, in Riverside, Calif. Turpin and her husband, David, who pleaded guilty to years of torture and abuse of 12 of their 13 children have been sentenced to life in prison with possibility of parole after 25 years. (Will Lester/The Orange County Register via AP, Pool) RIVERSIDE, Calif. – The eldest son and daughter of a couple who starved and shackled 12 of their children spoke publicly for the first time Friday, alternately condemning and forgiving their parents before a judge sentenced the pair to up to life in prison. Since being freed from their prison-like home more than a year ago, the two adult children of David and Louise Turpin described how they had gained control of their lives and, despite receiving little education at home, were now enrolled in college and learning simple things, including how to ride a bike, swim and prepare a meal. They are still thin from years of malnutrition. "I cannot describe in words what we went through growing up," said the oldest son, now 27. "Sometimes I still have nightmares of things that have happened, such as my siblings being chained up or getting beaten. But that is the past and this is now. I love my parents and have forgiven them for a lot of the things that they did to us." The hearing put an end to a shocking case that had gone unnoticed until a 17-year-old girl escaped from the home in January 2018 and called 911. Investigators discovered a house of horrors hidden behind a veneer of suburban normalcy. The children — ages 2 to 29 — had been chained to beds, forced to live in squalor, fed only once a day, allowed to shower only once a year and deprived of toys and games. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night. As her children spoke from a lectern, 50-year-old Louise Turpin sobbed and dabbed her eyes with tissues. "I'm sorry for everything I've done to hurt my children," she said. "I love my children so much." Her husband, who was shaking and could not initially read from a written statement, let his lawyer speak for him until he regained his composure. He did not apologize for the abuse but wished his children well in with their educations and future careers and hoped they would visit him. He then began sobbing. Jack Osborn, a lawyer representing the seven adult Turpin children, said they understand the consequences of their parents' actions and are working hard toward forgiving them. Some plan to talk with their parents eventually, but others want no contact with them for 10 years. The one who called police was a hero for liberating her siblings, Osborn said. "Maybe but for that we wouldn't be here today," he said. The sentence of life with no chance of parole for 25 years was no surprise. It had been agreed to when the couple pleaded guilty in February to 14 counts each that included torture, cruelty and false imprisonment. The courtroom fell hushed as the oldest daughter, now 30, entered wearing a blue cardigan over a white shirt, her dark hair in a ponytail. Her eyes were already red from crying when she began to speak in the voice of a little girl. "My parents took my whole life from me, but now I'm taking my life back," she said, as her mother's lower lip quivered trying to hold back the tears. "Life may have been bad but it made me strong. I fought to become the person I am. I saw my dad change my mom. They almost changed me, but I realized what was happening. I immediately did what I could to not become like them." There was no explanation from the parents or lawyers about why the abuse occurred, but a letter from one of the children read by an attorney hinted at a home life that veered from birthday celebrations and trips to Disneyland and Las Vegas to severe punishment and disarray. "Through the years, things became more and more overwhelming, but they kept trusting in God," the girl wrote "I remember our mother sitting in her recliner and crying, saying she don't know what to do." She said her parents did not know the children were malnourished because they thought the children inherited a gene from their mother, who was small. From the outside, the home in a middle-class section of Perris, a small city about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles, appeared to be neatly kept, and neighbors rarely saw the kids outside, but nothing triggered suspicion. But when deputies arrived, they were shocked to find a 22-year-old son chained to a bed and two girls who had just been set free from shackles. All but one of the 13 children were severely underweight and had not bathed for months. The house was filled with the stench of human waste. The children said they were beaten, caged and shackled if they did not obey their parents. Investigators concluded that the couple's youngest child, a toddler, was the only one who was not abused. David Turpin, 57, had been an engineer for Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Louise Turpin was listed as a housewife in a 2011 bankruptcy filing. The teenage daughter who escaped jumped from a window. After a lifetime in isolation, the 17-year-old did not know her address, the month of the year or what the word "medication" meant. But she knew enough to punch 911 into a barely workable cellphone and began describing years of abuse to a police dispatcher. Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to homeschool their children, learning was limited. The oldest daughter only completed third grade. Referring to the restraints, the oldest daughter's statement said her mother "didn't want to use rope or chain but she was afraid her children were taking in too much sugar and caffeine." Life got more difficult after her mother's parents died in 2016. Her parents tried their best, "and they wanted to give us a good life," she said. "They believed everything they did was to protect us." https://www.foxnews.com/us/parents-who-starved-and-shackled-children-sentenced-to-life
  14. I have a hard time believing Pa. survey. Survey group was probably bribed with large supply of Cadbury Eggs LFG - See South Carolina favors Jelly Beans.
  15. Butler couple, a former hospital CEO and an ex-county detective, indicted in $1.3 million fraud Updated: 6:22 PM EDT Apr 19, 2019 Butler couple, a former hospital CEO and an ex-county detective, indicted in $1.3 million fraud PITTSBURGH — A former CEO of Butler Memorial Hospital and her husband, a former longtime Butler County detective whose duties involved fraud investigations, are named in a federal indictment that alleges a $1.3 million fraud, authorities said Friday. The 37-count indictment against Stephanie Roskovski, 48, and Scott Roskovski, 50, includes charges of mail fraud, conspiracy, embezzlement from a health care benefit program, money laundering and false statement in a loan application, U.S. Attorney Scott Brady's office said. The Roskovskis were at the federal courthouse in downtown Pittsburgh on Friday afternoon. It wasn't immediately clear if they had an attorney who could comment. The U.S. attorney's announcement says, in part; "According to the indictment, the Roskovskis, during the years 2011 through December 2017, perpetrated a fraud totaling more than $1.3 million on Butler Healthcare Providers, d/b/a Butler Memorial Hospital, where Stephanie Roskovski was employed and, for much of that time, served as the hospital’s Chief Operating Officer. During the time, Scott Roskovski was employed as a detective with the Butler County District Attorney’s Office where he conducted investigations involving fraud and other financial crimes. Counts One through 23 of the Indictment allege that the defendants conspired to and did defraud Butler Healthcare Providers by submitting requests to Butler Hospital for alleged business-related expenses that were used, or intended to be used, for personal expenditures. Those personal expenses included, among others, lavish family vacations, household furnishings, concert and event tickets, and the purchase of, and expenses associated with, a motocross racetrack they purchased in 2015 known as Switchback MX, LLC, located in Butler, Pennsylvania. Counts 24 through 28 charge Stephanie Roskovski with embezzling funds from a healthcare benefit program. Count 29 through 35 charge the couple with conspiring to launder the proceeds of the fraud and with engaging in monetary transactions intended, in part, to conceal their theft, as well as in monetary transactions involving fraud proceeds in excess of $10,000. Counts 36 and 37 allege that in March and July of 2018, the defendants made false statements to S&T Bank in applying for two loans totaling approximately $1.2 million. The indictment also includes forfeiture allegations." Postal inspectors, the IRS and the FBI were involved in the investigation, Brady said. SEE VIDEO REPORT ; https://www.wtae.com/article/butler-county-couple-indicted-fraud/27209528
  16. In FBI sting, 2 Pittsburgh area men charged with attempted child sex enticement via Grindr app; FBI offers advice to parents Men were each arrested after arranging to meet for planned sexual encounters Updated: 6:59 PM EDT Apr 19, 2019 Bob Mayo Reporter In FBI sting, 2 Pittsburgh area men charged with attempted child sex enticement via Grindr app; FBI offers advice to parents PITTSBURGH — FBI investigators say two Pittsburgh area suspects who each thought he was were swapping sex messages via Grindr with boys who were barely in their teens were actually communicating with FBI task force members. The men were each arrested after arranging to meet for planned sexual encounters. FBI Pittsburgh Special Agent In Charge Robert Jones said the two cases show how easy it is for potential predators to communicate anonymously with potential victims. In both cases, the means of communication was the social media app, but Jones said the cases are not about Grindr. "This particular app makes it a little bit easier to communicate in an anonymous fashion. But that's not really a requirement for this type of crime. You could set up sexual exploitation of a child over the telephone, through a digital device of any type." Jones said. The FBI says Joseph Hamilton, 38, of the North Side, thought he was enticing a 13-year-old boy to have sex and meet with him near the T-station by Station Square. He was arrested at a gas station nearby Thursday. It also charges that Thomas Stultz, 36, of Bellevue, thought he was enticing a 14-year-old boy to meet for sex near the T-station by Heinz Field. Stultz was arrested April 5. Jones believes parents and guardians monitoring communications of their young people is worthwhile. "If you know who your kid is talking to and you have open communications with your child or young person in your care, that's certainly the best way to protect against something like this," Jones said. "That is sometimes viewed by parents and guardians as an invasion of their privacy. I would say that someone at the range of 13 or 14 is probably better protected if there is a little bit more privacy invasion than most people would tolerate as an adult." More than a dozen people, including four FBI special agents, eight local law enforcement officers and an analyst work full time on these sorts of cases on the local FBI Violent Crimes Against Children Task Force based in the FBI's Pittsburgh office.. Despite the coincidence of the Hamilton and Stultz cases, Jones does not believe there's a spike in such cases in the Pittsburgh area. "The fact that these crimes are committed on their own alarms everyone, but we're seeing nothing to indicate that anything is different here in Pittsburgh or this year causing these types of violations to be increased," Jones said SEE VIDEO REPORT ; https://www.wtae.com/article/in-fbi-sting-2-pittsburgh-area-men-charged-with-attempted-child-sex-enticement-via-grindr-app-fbi-offers-advice-to-parents/27211784
  17. Survey: Reese's Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs are the favorite Easter candy in Ohio by Gabi Warwick Friday, April 19th 2019 AA <p>(Photo: CBS Austin){/p} MIAMI VALLEY, Ohio (WKEF/WRGT) - Ohio has spoken, and it turns out that Reese's Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs are our favorite sweet treat for Easter. RetailMeNot found that across the country, people can't get enough of the chocolate eggs. Those are then followed up by Cadbury Eggs, Jelly Beans, Chocolate Bunnies and then Peeps. Here's the breakdown across the 50 states: Alabama: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Alaska: Chocolate Bunnies Arizona: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Arkansas: Cadbury Eggs California: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Colorado: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Connecticut: Chocolate Bunnies Delaware: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Florida: Jelly Beans Georgia: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Hawaii: Cadbury Eggs Idaho: Cadbury Eggs Illinois: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Indiana: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Iowa: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Kansas: Chocolate Bunnies Kentucky: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Louisiana: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Maine: Cadbury Eggs Maryland: Cadbury Eggs Massachusetts: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Michigan: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Minnesota: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Mississippi: Cadbury Eggs Missouri: Chocolate Bunnies Montana: Jelly Beans Nebraska: Cadbury Eggs Nevada: Cadbury Eggs New Hampshire: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs New Jersey: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs New Mexico: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs New York: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs North Carolina: Cadbury Eggs North Dakota: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Ohio: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Oklahoma: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Oregon: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Pennsylvania: Cadbury Eggs Rhode Island: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs South Carolina: Jelly Beans South Dakota: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Tennessee: Peeps Texas: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Utah: Cadbury Eggs Vermont: Chocolate Bunnies Virginia: Peeps Washington: Cadbury Eggs Washington DC: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs West Virginia: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Wisconsin: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs Wyoming: Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Eggs https://wjactv.com/news/offbeat/survey-reeses-peanut-butter-chocolate-eggs-are-the-favorite-easter-candy-in-ohio
  18. Odd News April 18, 2019 / 2:19 PM Airborne ladder shatters windshield on highway By Ben Hooper (0) April 18 (UPI) -- A Las Vegas woman's dashboard camera captured the moment an airborne ladder crashed into her windshield on the highway. Madi Nelson said she was driving on northbound U.S. Highway 95 Wednesday when the van in front of her drove over the ladder, sending the object flying through the air into her windshield. The impact shattered the glass, but the windshield remained in place. Nelson is asking anyone who knows where the ladder came from to get into contact. https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2019/04/18/Airborne-ladder-shatters-windshield-on-highway/3431555610366/?sl=3
  19. Reported accident in area of 69.6 mm Westbound on I-80. Time 7:24 AM. St.3 and ambulance to respond. Use caution in the area.
  20. I - 080 Last Updated: 04/19/2019 06:36:58 PM County: Clearfield County Municipality: SANDY TOWNSHIP Description: Crash on I-80 eastbound between Exit 97: US 219 - DUBOIS/BROCKWAY and Exit 101: PA 255 - DUBOIS/PENFIELD. All lanes closed.
  21. Jefferson St.4 requested to shut down EXIT 97 Eastbound and divert traffic on to Rt.219 to DuBois and to Exit 101 Eastbound-- 6:34PM.
  22. Reported 2 vehicle accident in area of 99 mm Eastbound on I-80. Time 6:02 PM. St.38, 37 and ambulance to respond. Use caution in the area.
  23. See The Entertainment at Grandstand of Centre County Grange Fair ----- https://grangefair.com/grandstand-entertainment/
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