Jump to content
GoDuBois.com
  • LOW PRICES
  • LOW PRICES
  • LOW PRICES

Tomates from Late Blight Stricken Plants


Recommended Posts

According to the original report on the late blight the fruit was safe to eat. We were advised  to rinse it in a solution of bleach although ingesting the fungus was  said to be harmless. At Ag Days this week the Master Gardeners at the County Extension booth were advising against using them. I contacted our county extension agent to find out what was now the official position. The Department of Food Sciences is taking a different position than the disease specialists. They are not saying that it is not safe to ingest the fungus but they are saying that if the tomato itself is infected the pH may be raised so they are not safe to can. As you may have heard this is also a concern with low acid tomatoes.

The second problem is that if the skin is actually broken secondary infections may occur or the tomato may be more heavily infected than is visible. The secondary infections could be harmful.

Tomatoes that come from blighted plants, as long as there are no visible lesions on the plant,are OK. They should be used immediately though as even the bleach apparently does not kill enough of the fungi to keep the tomatoes from spoiling. Any tomatoes that have visible lesions should be discarded.

Here is the website that carries the information  http://foodsafety.psu.edu/LateBlight.htm

I did ask if it would be safe to use the green tomatoes as a relish which would be highly acidic and I'm still awaiting an answer on that one. Will keep everyone informed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some tomatoes  that I took off the vine when green and 1/2 are turning red with out turning bad are they ok to eat?  

From what I have been reading on the Penn State websites if they haven't turned bad or have spots they are safe to eat. They are safe to can if no lesions are present. The fungus can not harm you. Secondary infections that may have entered through the breaks in the skin could be harmful if they do start to turn bad. Don't can anything that has visible lesions in the event that the pH is off or more harmful organisms are present. I'm still waiting for information on if they would be safe to can if done in vinegar or something as a relish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

From what I have been reading on the Penn State websites if they haven't turned bad or have spots they are safe to eat. They are safe to can if no lesions are present. The fungus can not harm you. Secondary infections that may have entered through the breaks in the skin could be harmful if they do start to turn bad. Don't can anything that has visible lesions in the event that the pH is off or more harmful organisms are present. I'm still waiting for information on if they would be safe to can if done in vinegar or something as a relish.

Thanks I should have some to eat in a day or two.  mmmmmm:dance:

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a shame that so many people have lost their tomato crop. My husband is having the best tomato season he has ever had. He's got some italian tomatoes with more than 25 on each plant. I am not sure why he hasn't had the tomato blight like everyone else.

Please let me know by pm if you will be able to sell any of them. I am so desperate this year I have contacted a farm in Erie to see if they have any to pick. The prices I am being quoted for a bushel are outrageous.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had picked some green tomatoes because most of the plants and tomatoes got it.  Out of about a dozen tomatoes, only half are going to make it for now.  I ended up with one red one.  Hate to see the price of tomatoes and anything made with them.  Same goes for potatoes.  Does anyone know how the potatoes are doing.  My neighbor's got hit, at least the plant above ground.  Don't know how the actual potato will be.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had picked some green tomatoes because most of the plants and tomatoes got it.  Out of about a dozen tomatoes, only half are going to make it for now.  I ended up with one red one.  Hate to see the price of tomatoes and anything made with them.  Same goes for potatoes.  Does anyone know how the potatoes are doing.  My neighbor's got hit, at least the plant above ground.  Don't know how the actual potato will be.

FIL has tomatoes and potatoes...both are great.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest snellma

Please let me know by pm if you will be able to sell any of them. I am so desperate this year I have contacted a farm in Erie to see if they have any to pick. The prices I am being quoted for a bushel are outrageous.

I can give you a lady's name and number who sells them for $8 a bushel - you pick.  That is where I get my grapes, tomatoes, apples, and peppers every year.  Send me a p.m. if you are interested.  I talked to her about a week ago and she said she had beautiful tomatoes but they were still green.  No blight up there yet.  I go the last weekend of Sept. for grapes and she still has tomatoes then.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had picked some green tomatoes because most of the plants and tomatoes got it.  Out of about a dozen tomatoes, only half are going to make it for now.  I ended up with one red one.  Hate to see the price of tomatoes and anything made with them.  Same goes for potatoes.  Does anyone know how the potatoes are doing.  My neighbor's got hit, at least the plant above ground.  Don't know how the actual potato will be.

Tell him to dig the potatoes right now. The faster he gets them out the less likely they will rot. If he doesn't get them all and they are infected he will have the blight in the soil next year. This is how the Irish Potato Famine kept going.

 

I've got a new formula for washing the tomatoes to replace the bleach. I'll post it as soon as I have a few minutes to dig it out. I received it yesterday.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been lucky so far-- just septorium, or something, on the leaves, which hasn't affected the fruit.  I seem to get it every year.  My neighbor and I wonder if our tomatoes may be catching it from an old flowering crabapple tree which seems to have the same affliction.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...