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Best beer can chicken recipe


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I smoked this for the first time Wednesday night, didn't cut it until last night, so I didn't take any pictures. This is definitely in my top 3, LFGal said it's the best chicken I've ever cooked. If you have never made a beer can chicken, get off the grilling forum :arghh: ;)

Very simple recipe, lifted straight from the Green Mountain Grill site with a few tweaks.

2 tbsp olive oil (I substituted butter because... butter)

1tbsp kosher salt

1tbsp black pepper

1 tbsp chopped rosemary

2 tsp chopped thyme

2 tsp chopped dill

4 garlic cloves minces (I substituted minced garlic from a jar because I keep it on hand. The moisture actually helped turn the rub into kind of a paste that clung to the chicken)

 Rub the entire bird with olive oil ( or butter if you really want it to taste good). Mix all of the rub ingredients together, then coat the bird as evenly as possible. The rub went further than I expected, I got a nice coating with enough left over to rub the inside of the chicken. Preheat the grill to 350 (or prep a kettle for indirect heat). Take your favorite beer and dispose of 1/4 to 1/3 of it the way you most see fit. Place the remainder of the beer on the rack, or in the beer can stand if you are a true connoisseur :D, then stand the chicken over the beer, head side up, until it settles over the beer onto the rack. The steaming beer will give the chicken a wonderfully juicy flavor that is infused through the entire bird by the time it is done cooking.

Cook at 350, or over indirect heat, for 2-2&1/2 hours. If using a meat probe, cook until the internal temperature is at least 165. That is my favorite temperature to pull a bird off the grill for maximum juiciness, but LFGal prefers hers more done. I shoot for about 175-180, which can lead to legs and wings that are overdone, but the breast  will be done enough for her liking. That is one reason I'm so fond of the beer can method, it really keeps the meat moist.

Let it rest for at least 20 minutes, but the longer you can let it rest, the longer the herbs have to settle into the meat. This recipe had a really fantastic flavor, and is going straight to the front of the line in my regular grilling rotation :good:

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12 hours ago, LFG said:

I smoked this for the first time Wednesday night, didn't cut it until last night, so I didn't take any pictures. This is definitely in my top 3, LFGal said it's the best chicken I've ever cooked. If you have never made a beer can chicken, get off the grilling forum :arghh: ;)

Very simple recipe, lifted straight from the Green Mountain Grill site with a few tweaks.

2 tbsp olive oil (I substituted butter because... butter)

1tbsp kosher salt

1tbsp black pepper

1 tbsp chopped rosemary

2 tsp chopped thyme

2 tsp chopped dill

4 garlic cloves minces (I substituted minced garlic from a jar because I keep it on hand. The moisture actually helped turn the rub into kind of a paste that clung to the chicken)

 Rub the entire bird with olive oil ( or butter if you really want it to taste good). Mix all of the rub ingredients together, then coat the bird as evenly as possible. The rub went further than I expected, I got a nice coating with enough left over to rub the inside of the chicken. Preheat the grill to 350 (or prep a kettle for indirect heat). Take your favorite beer and dispose of 1/4 to 1/3 of it the way you most see fit. Place the remainder of the beer on the rack, or in the beer can stand if you are a true connoisseur :D, then stand the chicken over the beer, head side up, until it settles over the beer onto the rack. The steaming beer will give the chicken a wonderfully juicy flavor that is infused through the entire bird by the time it is done cooking.

Cook at 350, or over indirect heat, for 2-2&1/2 hours. If using a meat probe, cook until the internal temperature is at least 165. That is my favorite temperature to pull a bird off the grill for maximum juiciness, but LFGal prefers hers more done. I shoot for about 175-180, which can lead to legs and wings that are overdone, but the breast  will be done enough for her liking. That is one reason I'm so fond of the beer can method, it really keeps the meat moist.

Let it rest for at least 20 minutes, but the longer you can let it rest, the longer the herbs have to settle into the meat. This recipe had a really fantastic flavor, and is going straight to the front of the line in my regular grilling rotation :good:

Thanks for sharing this one. My beer chicken is usually a simple rub of olive oil and garlic pepper. The beer is usually a lager or darker variety. The choice of beer is noticeable. My favorite so far is a rub of pesto with some extra minced garlic and a little extra olive oil added to help cover the bird. I never put the rub on the inside. Duh.  I'll be doing that next time. This recipe looks like a keeper. 

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8 hours ago, Lupara said:

Thanks for sharing this one. My beer chicken is usually a simple rub of olive oil and garlic pepper. The beer is usually a lager or darker variety. The choice of beer is noticeable. My favorite so far is a rub of pesto with some extra minced garlic and a little extra olive oil added to help cover the bird. I never put the rub on the inside. Duh.  I'll be doing that next time. This recipe looks like a keeper. 

Beer choice definitely matters, I have a local favorite I like. I'm wanting to try one of the coffee stouts out of curiosity

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  • 4 weeks later...

I had an interesting conversation with the son during dinner. He detailed a local commercial operation's technique for moist grilled chicken. It is very good as well.
No beer can involved. They will use a simple rub of seasoned salt. Then the bird goes into a pan with a shallow layer of vinegar and butter at the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan and chicken tightly with foil and cook in a conventional oven at 350 until internal temperature is 130 degrees. Remove the foil and put in the  grill/smoker at 300 degrees until internal temp is 165 degrees.
We didn't see the reason for the butter in the pan. I suspect the vinegar provides flavor while tenderizing.
He said a rule is not to smoke fowl too much.
  
Next go round I'll try this cooking method but with my pesto with a little extra minced garlic as the rub. The same combination of sawdust. We found it a nice subtle smoky flavor. At the very least I'll have the entire can of beer to dispose of as LFG suggested.:good:

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  • 2 months later...
On 1/26/2020 at 11:26 AM, Lupara said:

I had an interesting conversation with the son during dinner. He detailed a local commercial operation's technique for moist grilled chicken. It is very good as well.
No beer can involved. They will use a simple rub of seasoned salt. Then the bird goes into a pan with a shallow layer of vinegar and butter at the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan and chicken tightly with foil and cook in a conventional oven at 350 until internal temperature is 130 degrees. Remove the foil and put in the  grill/smoker at 300 degrees until internal temp is 165 degrees.
We didn't see the reason for the butter in the pan. I suspect the vinegar provides flavor while tenderizing.
He said a rule is not to smoke fowl too much.
  
Next go round I'll try this cooking method but with my pesto with a little extra minced garlic as the rub. The same combination of sawdust. We found it a nice subtle smoky flavor. At the very least I'll have the entire can of beer to dispose of as LFG suggested.:good:

Followed this recipe Sunday with another turkey breast. The family and I agreed the best turkey weve had. Always wait 15 min to start carving.

 

20200428_101216.jpg

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