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Updates on hydroxychloroquine ....


Pompeii
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They are considering several drugs that are already approved for other treatments but that also have known anti-viral qualities.  Some have been tested or are currently in testing, but the Chloroquine is ready to prescribe.  President Trump signed some liability paperwork today to allow its use on specific conditions.

Commercial masks and protective clothing is now permitted to be used by hospitals but will be expensive for the hospitals to purchase.  It was ordered into production in January but the needed legislation wasn't complete. He was hoping to have some information on that problem this afternoon.  I was extremely impressed by what they have done to prepare for this part of the disease spread.  We're just getting to the peak of it which will pass much faster with fewer people contaminating each other. Thus the quarantine and orders to stay home away from people.

Hopefully everyone complies so this will go away as soon as possible.

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Chloroquine with a Z pack has had good results in some patients. The University of Minnesota has been testing Losartan. I hope it works because my elderly mom has been taking it for its prescribed use. So she would have a measure of protection.

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Sunday issued an emergency-use authorization for a pair of anti-malaria drugs as health officials work to combat the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said in a statement that the authorization would allow 30 million doses of hydroxychloroquine sulfate and 1 million doses of chloroquine phosphate to be donated to the Strategic National Stockpile. The doses of hydroxychloroquine sulfate were donated by Sandoz, while the chloroquine phosphate was developed by Bayer Pharmaceuticals. 

The products will be "distributed and prescribed by doctors to hospitalized teen and adult patients with COVID-19, as appropriate, when a clinical trial is not available or feasible," HHS said. 

President Trump has repeatedly touted the anti-malaria drugs as a possible coronavirus "game changer," despite warnings from health officials that not enough is known about their effects on COVID-19. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, said during a press briefing earlier this month that much of what is known about the drug is based on "anecdotal reports."

"It was not done in a controlled clinical trial, so you really can’t make any definitive statement about it," he said. 

Hydroxychloroquine sulfate and chloroquine phosphate are oral prescription drugs typically used to treat malaria and other diseases, HHS noted. The department acknowledged that there are no approved treatments for COVID-19 but said that "both drugs have shown activity in laboratory studies against coronaviruses."

The department said that clinical trials are still needed to "provide scientific evidence that these treatments are effective." 

"Scientists in America and around the world have identified multiple potential therapeutics for #COVID19, including chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine," HHS Secretary Alex Azar said in a tweet following the announcement. "Trump is taking every possible step to protect Americans from the coronavirus and provide them with hope."

The FDA has permitted New York state to test the anti-malaria drugs on certain patients, Politico reported.

The coronavirus, which first appeared in China in December, has infected more than 732,000 people worldwide, including roughly 143,000 individuals in the U.S., according to a Johns Hopkins University database.

The outbreak has led to sweeping social distancing measures designed to slow the spread of the disease and lessen the strain on health care systems experiencing a surge in patients. Trump announced on Sunday that many of the federal guidelines in the U.S. would remain in place through April 30.

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3 minutes ago, Pompeii said:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Sunday issued an emergency-use authorization for a pair of anti-malaria drugs as health officials work to combat the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said in a statement that the authorization would allow 30 million doses of hydroxychloroquine sulfate and 1 million doses of chloroquine phosphate to be donated to the Strategic National Stockpile. The doses of hydroxychloroquine sulfate were donated by Sandoz, while the chloroquine phosphate was developed by Bayer Pharmaceuticals. 

The products will be "distributed and prescribed by doctors to hospitalized teen and adult patients with COVID-19, as appropriate, when a clinical trial is not available or feasible," HHS said. 

President Trump has repeatedly touted the anti-malaria drugs as a possible coronavirus "game changer," despite warnings from health officials that not enough is known about their effects on COVID-19. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, said during a press briefing earlier this month that much of what is known about the drug is based on "anecdotal reports."

"It was not done in a controlled clinical trial, so you really can’t make any definitive statement about it," he said. 

Hydroxychloroquine sulfate and chloroquine phosphate are oral prescription drugs typically used to treat malaria and other diseases, HHS noted. The department acknowledged that there are no approved treatments for COVID-19 but said that "both drugs have shown activity in laboratory studies against coronaviruses."

The department said that clinical trials are still needed to "provide scientific evidence that these treatments are effective." 

"Scientists in America and around the world have identified multiple potential therapeutics for #COVID19, including chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine," HHS Secretary Alex Azar said in a tweet following the announcement. "Trump is taking every possible step to protect Americans from the coronavirus and provide them with hope."

The FDA has permitted New York state to test the anti-malaria drugs on certain patients, Politico reported.

The coronavirus, which first appeared in China in December, has infected more than 732,000 people worldwide, including roughly 143,000 individuals in the U.S., according to a Johns Hopkins University database.

The outbreak has led to sweeping social distancing measures designed to slow the spread of the disease and lessen the strain on health care systems experiencing a surge in patients. Trump announced on Sunday that many of the federal guidelines in the U.S. would remain in place through April 30.

Trump is doing his JOB:D

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President Trump has been absolutely amazing in his flexibility and ability to get people working together quickly without making problems. His business experience has benefitted us all well. He has led us through the maze of choices in the best way he sees with the advice of excellent professionals to whom he listens before making final decisions. He also shows hope and enthusiasm which admitting that it may not turn out the way that he chooses. I am concerned about the stamina of all those who are dealing with this pandemic, President Trump and his Coronavirus Staff especially. They have all looked exhausted physically and mentally from time to time.

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Full interview from lastnight .... He said it is a “game changer”, and the “beginning of the end” of the pandemic.

 Dr. Stephen M. Smith, Executive Director and Founder, Smith Center for Infectious Diseases and Urban Health, East Orange, New Jersey give his summary of the significance of his findings.

His credentials are about as good as you can get: https://www.smithcenternj.org/about-our-doctors/ The implications are that you don't need 30,000 ventilators at $12 to $17,000 a pop, for NYC if doctor's will simply prescribe the -- $20 for the full 5-day regimen -- of Hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin and maybe throw in a little Zinc for good measure. 

 

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Most major hospitals did not bother to wait for FDA, or any government agency's formal approval, to write these drugs into their protocols for treatment of COVID patients.  Many of these treatment protocols were well into development before these drugs started making the news.  They felt confident enough that it would work, and if it didn't work for most patients, it was still woth it for the others it did help.

As I have stated before, most of the real brain power is in our universities and major hospitals and not sitting behind a desk in some government office.

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Detroit Dem says Trump's touting of hydroxychloroquine helped save her life

LANSING – A Democratic state representative from Detroit is crediting hydroxychloroquine — and Republican President Donald Trump who touted the drug — for saving her in her battle with the coronavirus.

State Rep. Karen Whitsett, who learned Monday she has tested positive for COVID-19, said she started taking hydroxychloroquine on March 31, prescribed by her doctor, after both she and her husband sought treatment for a range of symptoms on March 18.

"It was less than two hours" before she started to feel relief, said Whitsett, who had experienced shortness of breath, swollen lymph nodes, and what felt like a sinus infection. She is still experiencing headaches, she said.

Whitsett said she was familiar with "the wonders" of hydroxychloroquine from an earlier bout with Lyme disease, but does not believe she would have thought to ask for it, or her doctor would have prescribed it, had Trump not been touting it as a possible treatment for COVID-19.

Trump, at his daily coronavirus briefings, has repeatedly touted the drug in combination with the antibiotic azithromycin, despite criticism from health professionals that it is unproven and potentially dangerous. There have also been complaints that Trump's remarks have resulted in a shortage of the drug for those people who normally use it for its recommended purposes.

But Whitsett said Trump's comments helped in her case.

"It has a lot to do with the president ... bringing it up," Whitsett said. "He is the only person who has the power to make it a priority."

 

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On 4/6/2020 at 10:26 PM, Pompeii said:

Detroit Dem says Trump's touting of hydroxychloroquine helped save her life

LANSING – A Democratic state representative from Detroit is crediting hydroxychloroquine — and Republican President Donald Trump who touted the drug — for saving her in her battle with the coronavirus.

State Rep. Karen Whitsett, who learned Monday she has tested positive for COVID-19, said she started taking hydroxychloroquine on March 31, prescribed by her doctor, after both she and her husband sought treatment for a range of symptoms on March 18.

"It was less than two hours" before she started to feel relief, said Whitsett, who had experienced shortness of breath, swollen lymph nodes, and what felt like a sinus infection. She is still experiencing headaches, she said.

Whitsett said she was familiar with "the wonders" of hydroxychloroquine from an earlier bout with Lyme disease, but does not believe she would have thought to ask for it, or her doctor would have prescribed it, had Trump not been touting it as a possible treatment for COVID-19.

Trump, at his daily coronavirus briefings, has repeatedly touted the drug in combination with the antibiotic azithromycin, despite criticism from health professionals that it is unproven and potentially dangerous. There have also been complaints that Trump's remarks have resulted in a shortage of the drug for those people who normally use it for its recommended purposes.

But Whitsett said Trump's comments helped in her case.

"It has a lot to do with the president ... bringing it up," Whitsett said. "He is the only person who has the power to make it a priority."

But, but CNN and the rest of the MSM says it doesnt work now.

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Maybe it will work on some people and not others. Maybe the placebo effect will kick in. Maybe it will lessen the symptoms. Maybe it will prevent the virus. Maybe it will do nothing. I still don't see the argument. If you want to try it your doctor should prescribe it. If it is used for malaria it isn't going to hurt you. If nothing else you won't be getting malaria. 

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President Emmanuel Macron visited a French doctor in Marseille on Thursday whose work on a drug normally used for auto-immune diseases has been promoted by US President Donald Trump as a potential weapon against Covid-19 but has split medical opinion.

Macron, who met Professor Didier Raoult at his Marseille hospital behind closed doors, did not endorse the treatment, his office said, adding that it was too early for the French government to assess its effectiveness.

"One visit does not legitimate a scientific protocol, a visit simply marks the head of state's interest for these clinical trials, whether they are promising or not," a presidential adviser said.

But the presidential visit is a boost for the Marseille professor, who has become one of France's best-known doctors after his treatment was cited in a tweet by Trump, calling it "one of the biggest game-changers in the history of medicine".

His research team has published data showing that out of 80 mild Covid-19 patients treated with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, 93 percent had no detectable levels of the virus after eight days.

Doctors have questioned the value of the Marseille study and several papers from China on the same treatment as being too small or poorly designed to offer hard evidence of benefit.

Most do not compare outcomes of patients who received the therapies with people who did not, considered the most reliable measure of a drug's effectiveness.

Last week, doctors in Paris reported that they tried to replicate the results of the Marseille study and failed.

'New' study

According to Les Echos newspaper, Raoult gave Macron the results of a new study on 1,061 patients showing a 91 percent success rate.

Asked about the report, the presidential adviser said Macron had taken note of a certain number of elements presented by the professor and would give it careful consideration, in particular at a meeting with his scientific advisory panel.

 

 

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669 patients seen in my Monroe, NY practice with either test proven or clinically diagnosed corona infection

0 deaths

0 intubations

4 hospitalizations for pneumonia - patients are on iv antibiotics and improving 

As of 3/27/20 6am.  As per WHO, CDC, ECDC, NHC

World statistics -  531,860 cases / 24,057 deaths = 4.5% death rate
US statistics - 85,653 cases / 1290 deaths = 1.5 % death rate


Dr Zelenko statistics - 699 cases / 0 deaths = 0% death rate


patients treated with three drug regimen

1- hydroxychloroquine 200mg twice a day for 5 days
2- azithromycin 500mg once a day for five days
3- zinc sulfate 220mg once a day for five days

CONCLUSION - TREAT AS EARLY AND AS AGGRESSIVELY AS POSSIBLE IN THE OUTPATIENT SETTING

Respectfully, 

Dr. Vladimir (Zev) Zelenko

 

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Why a Pittsburgh-area family opted for unproven hydroxychloroquine for sick dad

Bob Schrecengost, a resident at Caring Heights in Kennedy, is one of the 759 Allegheny County residents diagnosed with covid-19. The McKees Rocks native turns 77 on Friday.

Schrecengost has dementia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and has battled two recent non-covid-19 respiratory infections. Those conditions led his daughter, Lisa Smarra, to pursue alternative treatments for him.

That includes using hydroxychloroquine, a drug normally used to treat malaria and lupus but unproven in effectively treating covid-19.

“It was scary because we didn’t know what was going to happen,” Smarra said.

Schrecengost’s doctor, who wouldn’t comment for this story, was hesitant to prescribe hydroxychloroquine, Smarra said. Schrecengost had been treated with acetaminophen (sold as Tylenol) and a course of antibiotics commonly called a Z-Pak, Smarra said.

She started researching what else could be done for her dad and asked if hydroxychloroquine was an option.

The drug has been recommended by President Trump, although medical professionals have been wary about using it because of its side effects.

There isn’t enough data to support whether hydroxychloroquine is effective, and doctors at UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh on Thursday launched a program to study it along with other potential drugs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifies the drug as among those under investigation for treating covid-19. The Food and Drug Administration has authorized doctors to prescribe it in emergencies.

But FDA scientist Denise Hinton warns in the letter providing the authorization that “the safety profile of these drugs has only been studied for FDA-approved indications, not covid-19.”

“It is remarkably unproven,” said Dr. Thomas Walsh, an infectious disease specialist who is also a member of Allegheny Health Network’s pandemic response team. “We have very, very limited data.”

The downside is potentially lethal side effects, which include heart failure, Walsh said.

“It is certainly an agent that doesn’t come without its risk,” he said.

Allegheny Health Network isn’t widely using the drug but is considering it for hospitalized patients who understand the “significant risk” associated with using it, Walsh said.

In Schrecengost’s case, his daughter mentioned the possibility of using hydroxychloroquine to her father’s nurse and then to his doctor, Smarra said.

“We were confronted with this particular decision to use this medication, knowing there could possibly be serious or fatal reactions to it,” she said.

But given her father’s medical history, “we felt we had to take drastic measures to try to help him whatever way we could,” she said.

Hydroxychloroquine can cause heart failure for some people. Smarra worried about that, but her father hasn’t had any side effects from the medicine, she said.

Schrecengost was given his first dose of hydroxychloroquine on Sunday, April 5. On Tuesday, Smarra said her father’s temperature was normal and his condition appeared to be improving.

“He is actually up and sitting in his wheelchair today, out of bed for the first day since Friday,” she said Tuesday.

Schrecengost was feeling weaker on Wednesday, Smarra said.

“There will be rough days, I’m sure,” she wrote in an email.

Smarra has been worried about her dad since March 31, when another resident at the Caring Heights Community Care and Rehabilitation Center was diagnosed with covid-19.

“The facility acts in the best interest of its residents to promote their health, safety and welfare. Due to HIPAA regulations, we cannot comment on the personal health information of our residents. We continue to work closely with the Department of Health and continue to follow all necessary guidelines,” Caring Heights administrator Lyn Manns said in a statement.

Schrecengost was fine Wednesday, April 1, when Smarra made her daily visit . The next day, Smarra got the news her father had a fever and his oxygen levels were low. He tested positive for covid-19 and his condition deteriorated, she said.

“It really just hit him like a ton of bricks,” Smarra said.

She’s thankful for the care her father has received at Caring Heights. She calls twice a day, and they keep her updated.

“I try not to bother them. They are incredibly busy,” Smarra said. “They are just amazing people, and they’re really dedicating themselves to their patients during this critical time.”

Although she visits daily and can wave at her dad through a window, they haven’t been together since March 13, Smarra said.

“It is heartbreaking,” Smarra said. “It is one of the most heartbreaking things that I think a child has to go through — to see their parent suffer and not be able to hold their hand and kiss their forehead.”

Tom Davidson is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, tdavidson@triblive.com or via Twitter .

 
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39 elderly Texans successfully complete hydroxychloroquine treatment for COVID-19, doctor says
Patients completed a five-day treatment and their doctor said none of the patients experienced side effects.

 

Fifty-six residents at this senior facility in Galveston County contracted the novel coronavirus. Dr. Robin Armstrong said 39 of them gave him permission to treat them with hydroxychloroquine pills.

“Most of the patients have done well. And, you know, and I think that that is suggestive that the medication is helpful,” Armstrong told WFAA.

But notice that Armstrong qualified his answer by saying “most of the patients.” 

“Well, I would say I would say all the patients have done well,” Armstrong added.

On Sunday, those 39 patients finished five days of treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Dr. Armstrong said no one experienced any side effects.

“We've got one patient now that kind of goes back and forth,” said Dr. Armstrong, “He's an older gentleman, but we're kind of nursing him through the process, but he's getting better.

Two patients receiving hydroxychloroquine have had to go to hospital for unrelated conditions, Armstrong disclosed; a woman had a fall and a man got dehydrated in his room because he was not eating and drinking.

But for the first time since this treatment began, many of those who have recovered from the virus have been able to go outside and get some fresh air over the last 48 hours, Armstrong said.

Hear more about Dr. Armstrong's experience on the latest episode of Y'all-itics. 


The 65-year-old anti-malarial drug became controversial after Pres. Trump said it was a promising possibility for COVID-19 patients. 

Dr. Armstrong is a Republican activist and said he supports the president, but at first questioned whether hydroxychloroquine would work for patients with coronavirus symptoms.

“When this hydroxychloroquine came out, I was a bit skeptical,” he explained, “because I know the World Health Organization actually was not initially including it in their study, because they didn't think that it was very effective.”


Democrats have correctly cautioned that hydroxychloroquine remains unproven for treating the coronavirus. 

But if the president didn't bring attention to this drug, it’s doubtful there would be any political controversy around this pharmaceutical.

“I don't think so,” Armstrong said. “I don't think this would even be a conversation, honestly.”

Supply and demand have created a new side effect in the market for these tablets.

“I’ve been on this medication for about 20 years or so,” said Sandy Dixon, who lives in Euless in Tarrant County.

Hydroxychloroquine helps her live with lupus, but she says the pills have become harder for her to find since some doctors began using them for coronavirus patients.

“I understand for them it’s an ‘if’ but for me it’s not an ‘if’ factor. I need the medicine every day to be able to function.”

A Kroger spokesperson told WFAA that its Texas pharmacies have hydroxychloroquine in stock.

CVS and Walgreens said it’s now limiting these pills to ensure everyone with a prescription gets some.

Messages to both WalMart and Tom Thumb have not been returned.

Armstrong is quick to note that hydroxychloroquine is not a cure for COVID-19 but he said, in his experience, it can help reduce the severity of the symptoms in some patients.

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