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https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2021/02/18/penndot-tolling-bridges/

Two bridges locally will be tolled.  More wonderful news from our terrible representation in Harrisburg.  This will force side roads to become busier and more damaged.  Notice the number of bridges on I-80.  Setting the foundation for the entire road to be a toll road.  

 

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21 minutes ago, NikonSniper said:

Who are they trying to BS!! That toll money will get squandered on the failing PA school system/pension fund or some other pet project.

Gramian said her agency is considering a vehicle toll for a bridge of $1 or $2, which she explained could generate $1.8 billion in potential toll revenue.Senate Transportation Committee Majority Chairman

Wayne Langerholc, R-Cambria, said lawmakers plan to exercise oversight over the tolling plans through a number of committee hearings.

The committee’s minority chairman, Sen. John Sabatina, D-Philadelphia, said the state’s transportation funding crisis is growing more serious each day.

Sen. Scott Hutchinson, R-Venango, criticized the tolling plan, calling it a “back door way to toll Interstate 80.”

The Pennsylvania Motor Truck Association is opposed to using toll revenue in P3 projects, association chairman Mark Guiffre told the committee.

“Tolling is the least efficient and most detrimental way to try to raise revenue,” Guiffre said, adding the cost of toll collection exceeds 20% to 30% of the revenue collected, and toll facilities are costly to build.

https://www.altoonamirror.com/uncategorized/2021/01/bridge-toll-plan-under-examination/

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2 hours ago, Lizard said:

Could you imagine if this passes. Half the traffic exiting off at 81 Hazen and getting back on in Brookville to avoid a bridge tax. 

The concept was approved in November by the Public Private Transportation Partnership board, the first time it had approved a plan involving user fees since it was created by a 2012 law, and requires no legislative approval.

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12 hours ago, Lizard said:

Could you imagine if this passes. Half the traffic exiting off at 81 Hazen and getting back on in Brookville to avoid a bridge tax. 

>>>  SARCASM  <<< ---The people In Brookville would love the gridlock it would cause with both East and West bound traffic going through town. It's bad enough when traffic has to go thru town when there is an accident between Exit 81 and Exit 78.

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Well I think it's a great idea !!!   Now our roads and bridges will be all fixed up . They can lower the gas tax to a reasonable amount and everyone will have all the money they want.    What a Joke, the pittance that they will get will be gobbled up in bureaucratic bullship and probably lose money in the end.  Look at the west Pittsburgh tollroads, 376 is deserted every time i'm on it, no matter the time of day.  Not sure but that has to be a money loser.  How about we toll the bridges in Pittsburgh, all 7000 of them, that should solve the problem.

1 bridge in Philly, 1 bridge in HBG and 1 bridge in Pitt  The rest in counties that dont matter to Tommy and his crew

Spare me "we need the money to fix the roads" then quit peeing away the money that you get on stuff that has nothing to do with ROADS 

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5 hours ago, mr.d said:

>>>  SARCASM  <<< ---The people In Brookville would love the gridlock it would cause with both East and West bound traffic going through town. It's bad enough when traffic has to go thru town when there is an accident between Exit 81 and Exit 78.

Some of the downtown businesses might enjoy it.  

If I may plug one of them...Wild Rose Bread Company.  Best bread anywhere, try it!

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3 hours ago, Cacao said:

Some of the downtown businesses might enjoy it.  

If I may plug one of them...Wild Rose Bread Company.  Best bread anywhere, try it!

Or you can buy a Bridge EZ Pass to go over any of the bridges.   That is the deal. EZ Passes.

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I-80 bridges in Jefferson County considered for tolling

 
north fork eb bridge

The eastbound North Fork bridge on Interstate 80 is pictured from below on Water Plant Road in Brookville.

Ben Destefan
 
 

BROOKVILLE – A proposed bridge project on Interstate 80 in Jefferson County could lead to tolling as part of a new initiative by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).

According to a news release from PennDOT, reconstruction of the North Fork bridges on I-80 in the Borough of Brookville and Pine Creek Township is one of nine candidate projects being considered for the Pathways Major Bridge Public-Private Partnership Initiative – commonly referred to as “P3.”

The concept is to use tolls to help pay for construction costs associated with these projects. PennDOT is reporting a current budget of $6.9 billion per year for statewide repairs, or less than half of the estimated $15 billion needed for infrastructure updates, the release states.

The Canoe Creek bridges in Clarion County are also on the list of P3 project candidates.

According to several news reports, tolls would be between $1 and $2 per trip, with the possibility of tolls beginning in 2023, but varying per project.

Tolling would be all electronic using E-Z pass or license plate billing, and all toll funds would go back to the bridge for construction, maintenance and operation, according to PennDOT.

“Our reliance on funding models from the last century leaves us especially vulnerable to fund losses stemming from volatile economic conditions and the increasing transition to alternative-fuel or electric vehicles,” PennDOT Secretary Yassmin Gramian said in the release. “This initiative will help us make much-needed improvements without compromising the routine projects our communities and industry partners rely on.”

The cost of the Jefferson County bridge project is estimated between $165 million to $185 million. The North Fork project is in a preliminary design phase with construction anticipated to begin in 2024.

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PennDOT describes a proposed 3.1-mile detour in Brookville using Jenks Street, Allegheny Boulevard, West Main Street and U.S 322 during construction.

“As part of the environmental review process, PennDOT is analyzing how bridge tolling may impact local communities and how alternate routes drivers could take to avoid the toll may impact local traffic and roadways,” according to PennDOT’s website. “When studies are completed in summer 2021, we will present our findings for public review and comment in a virtual meeting or, if safety precautions allow, an in-person public meeting.”

Project specificsPennDOT provides the following project description, in part, on its website:

“The (I-80) North Fork Bridges are dual structures (one eastbound and one westbound) built in 1962 and most recently rehabilitated in 2013. These bridges cross over the North Fork Redbank Creek and Water Plant Road in Brookville Borough and Pine Creek Township, Jefferson County. Combined, these bridges are expected to carry approximately 30,897 vehicles daily. Approximately 44 percent of the traffic over the bridges is truck traffic.

“The purpose of the project is to provide safe, efficient and effective crossings of I-80 over North Fork Redbank Creek and Water Plant Road. Both bridges have problematic fatigue details which have received multiple retrofits during the service lives of the structures. The eastbound bridge is in poor condition and the westbound bridge is in fair condition; inspections are required on a six-month and one-year basis, respectively. The existing bridges are separated by approximately 1,100 feet, with the Walter Dick Memorial Park located between and below the two bridges. Both bridges are reaching the end of their serviceable lifespan.

“Many crashes, nearly twice the statewide average, have occurred on this segment of I-80 due to a substandard curve on the western approach to the eastbound bridge.

“In addition to the replacement of the I-80 North Fork bridges, this project will include the replacement of the I-80 EB and WB bridges over Jenks Street, as well as the replacement of the Richardsville Road bridges over I-80. The project will also include the extension of the North Fork Park Culvert, which carries I-80 traffic over the tributary to North Fork Redbank Creek.

The learn more or to provide a comment about this proposed project, visit: www.Penndot.gov/i80NorthFork

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lawmaker calls for halt to PennDOT plan to toll nine bridges

by: The Associated Press

Posted:  / Updated: 
AP21055593617344.jpg?w=2560&h=1440&crop=

A person walks past the Interstate-95′s mile-long double-decked Girard Point Bridge in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. PennDOT named several bridges including the Girard Point Bridge that it said it is considering tolling to pay for the reconstruction. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

 

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The chair of Pennsylvania’s Senate Transportation Committee on Wednesday said he wants to halt plans to toll nine major bridges on interstates and, at the very least, require those plans to undergo more scrutiny and a vote by lawmakers.

Senate Transportation Committee Chair Wayne Langerholc, R-Cambria, said he opposes the proposals by Gov. Tom Wolf’s Department of Transportation.

Eight of the nine bridges are in the districts of Republican senators — including independent Sen. John Yudichak who caucuses with Republicans — and Langerholc said he has support from the Senate’s Republican majority leaders to move against the bridge-tolling proposal.

Legislation newly introduced by Langerholc would not necessarily kill PennDOT’s proposal. But Langerholc wants to subject it to approval by lawmakers and questioned whether the process used to approve the department’s plans were really envisioned by a 2012 law that created it.

“Now we see how PennDOT is attempting to use this for this size and scope of this large of a plan, and in my opinion, the legislation’s intent may not have been of this size and scope back then,” Langerholc said.

Transportation Secretary Yassmin Gramian has told lawmakers that the aging bridges are in need of major reconstruction and the department needs billions more to keep up with its public safety obligations.

Tolls would be between $1 and $2, probably both ways, raise about $2.2 billion and last from the start of construction in 2023 for three or four years until construction is finished, Gramian told lawmakers last month.

Langerholc’s bill would require the legislative authorization of any proposed transportation project with a user fee, even it is approved by the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board that lawmakers created in 2012.

The bill also aims to require PennDOT to provide more details to the board, lawmakers and the public about a proposed project before the board can approve it.

Wolf’s administration opposes Langerholc’s bill and, in a statement, PennDOT said it adds unnecessary and duplicative bureaucracy and “politicizes a process designed to foster innovation and efficient public-private collaboration.”

The board is composed of appointees of the governor and top lawmakers. In November, it authorized PennDOT to install electronic tolling gantries on bridges to finance their reconstruction, the first time it had approved toll projects.

The department named nine bridges last month, sparking protests from some lawmakers who said the tolls would be an unfair and unaffordable price for motorists and commercial haulers to pay.

“I think we need a much more comprehensive discussion around transportation funding,” Sen. Bob Mensch, R-Montgomery, said. “PennDOT has got to stop scaring and surprising people. Yeah, I know we have a crisis, but it’s got to be something that’s more equitable for the state.”

PennDOT’s plans have received an important note of support from House Appropriations Committee Chairman Stan Saylor, R-York, who told a hearing last month that PennDOT’s plans are “reasonable” and something that will undergo public hearings and comment.

PennDOT is currently taking public comments online for all the projects.

Lawmakers had an opportunity under the existing law to block PennDOT’s plan, but did not during the time allotted.

However, Langerholc questioned whether PennDOT’s plans met the requirements of the law to trigger the start of that period.

Rep. Mike Carroll, D-Luzerne, the ranking Democrat on the House Transportation Committee, said lawmakers knew about the deadline to object and let it pass.

When lawmakers created the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board in 2012, Carroll voted against it and warned colleagues during floor debate that it “hands off the direct authority to toll interstates, to toll bridges and to toll other transportation network features to an unelected commission.”

PennDOT’s plans were precisely what was envisioned by the 2012 law, and PennDOT followed the law to get them approved to raise the $2 billion that it needs, Carroll said.

“If somebody has a better proposal, let’s see it,” Carroll said.                                                                         https://www.wearecentralpa.com/news/regional-news/lawmaker-calls-for-halt-to-penndot-plan-to-toll-nine-bridges/

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Transportation Secretary Yassmin Gramian has told lawmakers that the aging bridges are in need of major reconstruction and the department needs billions more to keep up with its public safety obligations.

Tolls would be between $1 and $2, probably both ways, raise about $2.2 billion and last from the start of construction in 2023 for three or four years until construction is finished, Gramian told lawmakers last month.

 

Sure like the alcohol tax will end once the first Johnstown flood damage was paid for.  Just remember that once they are tolled there is not a chance in .... that the tolls will be ever lifted (see the PA Turnpike)  due to the fact that the pittance that they make will be spent on everything but roads and bridges.   Just like the highest gas tax in America, Our roads should be made of gold but...

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So....if I understand their plan;  Ol' Mumbles Joe just passed at $1.9 trillion dollar stimulus package that includes infrastructure (roads and bridges).  Pennsylvania gets a huge chunk of this "covid relief" money to fix the bridges....meanwhile, Gramian is requesting a toll on the bridges that planned to be fixed anyway with the stimulus money.

Got it....and the toll money gets diverted into Pa Turnpike Commission for all members to enjoy. 

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  • 1 month later...

Pennsylvania Senate Approves Bill To Halt PennDOT’s Plans To Toll 9 Bridges

The bill now goes to the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, but it may have a short life.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Republicans in Pennsylvania’s Senate are trying to make Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration start over on its plans to toll up to nine major bridges, approving a bill Tuesday to require the state Department of Transportation to undergo a new process that includes approval from the Legislature.

The bill passed the Republican-controlled chamber, 28-19, with the backing of every Republican and one Democrat.

The bill now goes to the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, but it may have a short life: Wolf opposes the bill, and the Senate lacks a veto-proof majority.

Republicans contend that the unilateral process leading to PennDOT’s announcement in February has lacked transparency and was never envisioned by lawmakers when they created the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board in 2012.

Successful transportation funding efforts have historically required buy-in and cooperation from lawmakers, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Pat Browne, R-Lehigh, said during floor debate.

“This initiative and the way it is being advanced is totally counter to that legacy,” Browne said.

Democrats, however, say Republicans are stepping back once again from their obligations to adequately fund the state’s growing transportation needs, and say PennDOT’s Major Bridge initiative is squarely within the scope of the 2012 law.

“As much as I loathe to tax my constituents to fix a bridge, I’d rather tax them than have them suffer through a catastrophe when the Girard Point Bridge falls down,” Sen. John Sabatina, D-Philadelphia, said during floor debate.

Sooner or later, Sabatina said, “a bridge is going to collapse and we’re all going to look at each other and say, ‘how did that happen? How could we have prevented that?’”

Opponents of the 2012 law warned its backers during floor arguments that year that it would create an avenue for an unelected commission to approve tolling projects.

The bill would require PennDOT to start the process over by providing more information about its proposals, publicly advertising them, taking public comment and seeking approval from both the governor and the Legislature.

In a statement, Wolf’s office said the bill undercuts the benefits of public-private partnerships, politicizes a process designed to foster innovation and efficiency and adds unnecessary bureaucracy that the 2012 law was designed to avoid.

In any case, the bill’s requirements around public input are already part of PennDOT’s normal process under state and federal law, Wolf’s office said.

PennDOT has not made final decisions on which of the bridges to toll.

Republicans opposing the projects say such tolls will damage the local economies, taking money from businesses and commuters. Wolf counters that it will stimulate the economy, generating more in economic investment by putting crews to work fixing bridges that are badly in need of repairs.

The fight comes amid a deepening stalemate over financing highways and public transit, prompting Wolf to propose phasing out Pennsylvania’s gasoline tax, the second-highest in the nation, and appoint a commission to recommend alternative ways to pay for the state’s needs.

Transportation Secretary Yassmin Gramian has told lawmakers that the aging bridges are in need of major reconstruction and the department needs billions more to meet its public safety obligations.

Tolls would be between $1 and $2, probably both ways, to help pay for about $2.2 billion in construction work and last from the start of construction in 2023 for three or four years until construction is finished, PennDOT officials have said.

The Public Private Transportation Partnership board gave PennDOT the go-ahead in November to pursue the tolling concept, the first time it had approved a plan involving user fees since it was created, and requires no legislative approval.                        https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2021/04/27/pennsylvania-senate-oks-bill-to-halt-plans-to-toll-bridges/

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Today in CE.  Toll on bridges will only last as long as the agreement.    PA to alcohol consumers after johnstown flood in 1899 (?) "the tax on alcohol will only be to resurrect johnstown after the flood... "     Buyer beware !!!!!

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7 hours ago, DS58 said:

Today in CE.  Toll on bridges will only last as long as the agreement.    PA to alcohol consumers after johnstown flood in 1899 (?) "the tax on alcohol will only be to resurrect johnstown after the flood... "     Buyer beware !!!!!

They'll just funnel the revenue to other places again. Probably the police pension

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  • 1 month later...

Senate Transportation Committee outraged at PennDot’s announcement to toll bridges

by: Alyssa Royster

Posted:  / Updated: 
 
 

HARRISBURG, Pa. (WTAJ) – The Senate Transportation Committee is outraged after the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation announced that its accepting bids for tolling existing bridges on the interstate system.

Senator Wayne Langerholc says they were blindsided, especially after spending the entire month of June negotiating a responsible budget with the Wolf Administration.

“The ink is not even dry on the budget yet. I think it’s fairly disingenuous. That we were able to allocate a significant amount of money, $279,000,000 to be exact to transportation projects” said Langerholc.

Despite the allocation PennDot announced that they’re still requesting qualifications for their Major Bridge P3 Program.

The initiative would put tolls on 9 bridges statewide, including one on I-80 in Jefferson County to achieve the same goal, but out of the pockets of Pennsylvania drivers.

“There is a different way to do this rather than just expecting residents of the state of PA to continue paying a fee, or a tax, or a toll. It’s just like it doesn’t matter to them and they’re going to move forward and just continue to put it on the backs of hardworking Pennsylvanians. Which I think is absolutely ridiculous. And I am absolutely outraged about it,” said Langerholc.

According to Langerholc, when he was first named chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee, PennDot said they’d be willing to listen to any kind of alternative to tolling. But says now when they’ve put one forth…

“It’s like its just falling on deaf ears. And I don’t know what it’s going to take to get there attention. Is it a lawsuit? I don’t know,” said Langerholc.

Langerholc says today’s announcement was especially frustrating after his committee has included PennDot in the process every step of the way.

“We didn’t even receive the courtesy of a heads up. There was an email hours before they were going to do this,” said Langerholc.

Langerholc says he’s been fighting this since he was first named chairman, and will continue to at all costs.                                                                                         SEE VIDEO REPORT    ;   https://www.wearecentralpa.com/news/local-news/senate-transportation-committee-outraged-at-penndots-announcement-to-toll-bridges/

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