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A Tree Commission/ordinance was carried out quite a few years ago, and it took almost a year and a half.  A state urban forester came in and helped us through it.  I don't know if it was ever adopted or if it is used for grants because some require that a tree commission and ordinance be in place to qualify.

I don't think the city knows the value of urban trees and I doubt they want to use the locals who are trained to do it. It's a mystery.

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44 minutes ago, Ignatius said:

Has DuBois any plans to do “street scaping”, replanting trees on streets, such as Main or Maple, laid bare by city projects?

I have not read of any plans to plant any new trees in any of the areas you listed.(nothing listed in the bids about trees)

Not sure if trees are even allowed to be replanted within a highway right a way. Everything I have read discourages the practice

 

https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/local_rural/training/fhwasa07018/Screen Shot 2021-06-15 at 9.47.18 AM.png

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2 hours ago, Guest Soccermom said:

I could be wrong, but did Penndot turn over their right of ways to Main Street and Maple Avenue to DuBois?

IIRC, they did for Main, not sure for Maple.  But, with the extent of work, burying of utility lines would have dramatically helped the appearance.

 

T

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Trees are a huge asset to a community for many reasons, and some of them are financial.  However, they must be very carefully chosen and sited for growth.  That's the problem that would take a Tree Commission to oversee.

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4 hours ago, Ignatius said:

IIRC, they did for Main, not sure for Maple.  But, with the extent of work, burying of utility lines would have dramatically helped the appearance.

 

T

The estimated cost of the project is $800,000 for the Maple Avenue sidewalks, $1.25 million for the Maple Avenue water line and $4 million for the Maple Avenue turnback from the state.(to the City) 2021

 The Sandy Township Supervisors at their Monday(November 2019)  meeting approved resolutions to take over three roads — Maple Avenue, Dixon Avenue and Tozier Avenue — through the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s “Turnback” Program.the township will receive a lump sum of money for taking over these roads, a little bit less than $2 million, to completely redo these roads

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The type of tree for Maple Avenue would not be a Red Maple unless the homeowners decided to put them in their yards.  Roots are the problem.  Trees along there would have to be small with small root systems, but there are lots that fit that description.  Columnar would work better than spreading, but again, they would have to be planted so they don't cause eventual hazards or digging problems with underground utilities.  Cutting the root system of trees is possible but it eventually leads to the death of the tree.  Every tree would have to be chosen and sited properly.

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14 hours ago, Petee said:

A Tree Commission/ordinance was carried out quite a few years ago, and it took almost a year and a half.  A state urban forester came in and helped us through it.  I don't know if it was ever adopted or if it is used for grants because some require that a tree commission and ordinance be in place to qualify.

I don't think the city knows the value of urban trees and I doubt they want to use the locals who are trained to do it. 

Well,  in my 20 years in landscaping, you can't really put trees in where side walks are..... the roots will just cause the same issues over time.. 

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I can tell you that I wouldn't do. Plant a female ginkgo. The fruit is abundant, sloppy and has a four odor. Plant an ornamental pear under any circumstances. They sucker. Those ones on the Pershing lot would form a forest if permitted. I think they put up suckers from every part of their root system. Cutting them just encourages them to grow faster. Awful trees! 

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" I wouldn't [...] Plant a female ginkgo. The fruit is abundant, sloppy and has a four odor."

Oh my yes. The high school I attended had a row of ginkos along the sidewalk in front of the school. Every year the sidewalk would be paved with fallen fruit and the air filled with the reek.

 

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Ginko are usually sold already sexed by tissue culture.  I did buy one less than 2 feet tall for about $10 which the guy had started himself so I have no idea what sex it is, but where it's planted, no one would care.  The leaves are so interesting.

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21 hours ago, lavender said:

I can tell you that I wouldn't do. Plant a female ginkgo. The fruit is abundant, sloppy and has a four odor. Plant an ornamental pear under any circumstances. They sucker. Those ones on the Pershing lot would form a forest if permitted. I think they put up suckers from every part of their root system. Cutting them just encourages them to grow faster. 

Some states they are on their invasive list where you can't plant or sell them

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There are alternatives to street trees, which in this day and age can be expensive to maintain. It's like anything else for each benefit there is a detriment. The trees have to be cared for and in most cases pruned. The leaves clog gutters both on rooves and at curbs and have to be removed. They are slippery when wet and can be hazardous to walk on. Some of the trees produce fruit or seeds that clutter the sidewalks. The seeds can germinate and cause problems. Those little trees that are growing on buildings are cute unless you own the building. Trees falling on cars or pedestrians are not common but the pictures are there for all to see. Then there is the major interference with electric and telephone lines for which they get pruned in ugly ways.  

Why not mandate green spaces in cities? Plant the trees in concentrated  areas where they are less likely to cause problems. A park in the middle of a city? A group of trees on a corner lot at an intersection? There are alternatives to the traditional line the streets with trees concept. Obviously the city isn't interested in putting trees back in along the streets and I'm sure they have their reasons. They seem to like parks though( both dog and human) so maybe that is the way to go. 

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4 hours ago, JimmyPete said:

The Bradford pear trees. 

State grants will no longer pay for the planting of Bradford Pears which can break out in huge section due to the upward and crowded branching structure on the trunk.  The ones in the Pershing Lot are either Cleveland Select if I remember correctly.  The one on Long Avenue were Bradford and were at the point of no return so they had to be removed.  

 

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