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  1. GANT: Police Seeking Public’s Assistance with Retail Theft Investigation August 10, 2019 12:21 am· Author: exploreJefferson CLEARFIELD, Pa. (GANT) – The Lawrence Township Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance with an investigation into a reported retail theft. (This article was provided by our News Partner GantDaily.com.) Police say the pictured male and female are wanted for questioning in relation to this incident, which occurred July 23 at 11:03 p.m. at the Wal-Mart Supercenter in Clearfield. The suspects were seen leaving in a Chevy Blazer. Anyone with identifying information is asked to contact Officer Elliott Neeper at the Lawrence Township Police at 814-765-1647/48 or 814-765-1533 and reference incident no.: 2019-00785.
  2. Man Falls to His Death After Climbing Cell Tower August 10, 2019 12:30 am· Author: exploreJefferson VENANGO CO., Pa. (EYT) – Police have released details on a man who fell to his death after climbing a cell tower in Venango County early Thursday morning. According to Franklin-based State Police, around 3:56 a.m. on Thursday, August 8, officers responded to the area of 523 Cooperstown Road in Jackson Township, Venango County, which was a neighboring property of 419 Cooperstown Road, for an apparent death investigation. The victim identified as 55-year-old William Eugene Wall, of Centerville, went from the neighboring property where family and friends were having a campfire to a nearby AT&T Tower on the adjacent property approximately 250 yards away. The victim then climbed an approximate seven-foot property fence that surrounded the AT&T Tower in a low-lighted area. The victim then climbed the 280-foot tall cellular tower for unknown means. The weather conditions consisted of a heavy fog that made the cellular tower slippery, and the victim is believed to have slipped while climbing to the top of the cellular tower, falling to the ground where he succumbed from his injuries. Life-saving measures were attempted by family members but were unsuccessful. PSP is currently investigating this incident as an accidental death due to the victim’s fall. The investigation is on-going with the assistance of the Venango County Coroner. Several calls to Venango County Coroner Christina Rugh have not been returned.
  3. If you have a dog in the house you will probably not have worry they have it covered.
  4. Believe transcript from Video report. Could not delete because wipe out whole article.
  5. Reported ATV rollover accident on Forest Colony Rd. off Rt.36 - Barnett Twp. north of Sigel. Time 12:12 PM. St.19, 10 and ambulance to respond. Use caution in the area. ----- UPDATE--- St.10 canceled - 12:24 PM.
  6. Police arrest suspect after woman stabbed to death at Downtown Pittsburgh bus stop; attack happened as police officer was checking on her 1 woman dead, another woman injured in stabbing on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street Share Updated: 6:53 PM EDT Aug 9, 2019 Police arrest suspect after woman stabbed to death at Downtown Pittsburgh bus stop; attack happened as police officer was checking on her 1 woman dead, another woman injured in stabbing on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street Share Video Player is loading. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration 1:59 Loaded: 31.62% 0:00 Stream Type LIVE Seek to live, currently playing liveLIVE Remaining Time -1:59 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Captions captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected en CC1 Captions Audio Track default, selected Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text ColorWhite Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Background ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyTransparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Advertisement: 0:01 Share James Wyatt, 23, of McKeesport now is scheduled to face a preliminary hearing Aug. 21 in this fatal stabbing attack Thursday in downtown Pittsburgh.He'srged with first-degree homicide in the stabbing death of Janice Purdue-Dance, of Erie, at a bus stop shelter on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street. Police say he immediately then attacked a second woman, whose name has not been made public and who was apparently not seriously hurt. Wyatt faces a count of aggravated assault for attacking the second woman.A check of court records by Pittsburgh's Action News 4 shows that just months ago, Wyatt completed serving three years probation in a negotiated guilty plea to several non-violent offenses in his home community of McKeesport. The probation was for carrying a firearm without a license.The 2016 sentence included 100 hours of community service , part of which he was permitted to serve in North Carolina. As part of that agreement , he also pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and an accident causing injury and damage but he was sentenced to no further penalties. A receiving stolen property charge was withdrawn.Wyatt also faces a citation for disorderly conduct issued in McKeesport from in February 2019. Purdue-Dance was fatally stabbed in the neck Thursday morning at a downtown bus stop, right in front of a Pittsburgh police officer who had been checking on the woman's well-being at the time, police said.Watch the latest report from Pittsburgh's Action News 4 in the video player above. The suspect also stabbed a bystander near the bus stop before he was subdued and taken into custody at the scene on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street, police said.Police arrested Wyatt on charges of criminal homicide and aggravated assault. The Allegheny County medical examiner identified the woman who was stabbed to death as Purdue-Dance, 61, of Erie. Purdue-Dance died at UPMC Mercy."We don't know the motivation at this time. We just don't know," said Cmdr. Vic Joseph, of the city's Major Crimes unit. He said the attack currently appears "by all accounts" to be a random act.Pittsburgh police later said in a press release that "there is no evidence to suggest that this attack was racially or religiously motivated."Joseph said an officer on patrol was talking to the woman, who appeared to be sleeping or possibly in medical distress at the bus stop, when a man came up and stabbed that woman and then assaulted a second woman who was walking down the street.The officer drew his gun, ordered the man to get on the ground and drop the weapon, then began applying pressure to the first woman's wound and tried to stop her bleeding, Joseph said.Hear from witnesses who saw the violence unfold in Pittsburgh's Action News 4 reporter Bob Mayo's report below: Police news conference on Downtown bus stop stabbing: Watch the video below.In response to another published report about the victims' clothing, officials said the woman who was fatally attacked at the bus stop was not wearing religious garb. Police said the woman who was stabbed while walking by the scene "may have been" wearing one. The woman who died has not been identified. The severity of the second victim's injuries was not clear; police said she was in stable condition at a hospital.The suspect was taken to police headquarters, where he was being interviewed by detectives Thursday afternoon. Witnesses gave Pittsburgh's Action News 4 their accounts of what they saw."A man came out of nowhere, coming from that way, and stabbed her in the neck twice and then proceeded on to the Muslim woman and started punching her in the face," witness Kimberly Andrews, of Homewood, told Pittsburgh's Action News 4. "The officer then pulled out his gun and told him to get onto the ground. He wouldn't . I then yelled to him to just lay on the ground. Then when he was on the ground, I ran into this building right here and got paper towels for the woman."Another witness described what he perceived from a different perspective."There was two ladies in the booth over there, and the guy got in an argument with one of them and the other one jumped in, and then he just pulled out a knife and started stabbing both of them," said George Williams, of McKees Rocks.From across the street, another witness saw the police officer react to the attacks."I was standing here and I heard some screaming. And then the cop, I looked over and the cop was screaming at this guy. Then he backed up and the cop pulled his gun and then he got down onto the ground and then all these cop cars pulled up and they restrained him," said Nick Emery, of the North Side.Another man says he knows one of the victims and spoke with her."She said 'I got stabbed!' I said, "Oh my God!' I knew her," said Chester Clark, of Oakland.Andrews, who returned to the scene later in the afternoon, was surprised and troubled that the bus stop was already back in service."I went and got flowers to put at the site," Andrews said, adding she was upset to see commuters in the bus shelter. "That they're sitting there. That it's not closed out for like respecting (the victim who died)," she said.Stay with the WTAE mobile app for updates. Download the app now to get connected with breaking news updates. PITTSBURGH — James Wyatt, 23, of McKeesport now is scheduled to face a preliminary hearing Aug. 21 in this fatal stabbing attack Thursday in downtown Pittsburgh. He's charged with first-degree homicide in the stabbing death of Janice Purdue-Dance, of Erie, at a bus stop shelter on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street. Police say he immediately then attacked a second woman, whose name has not been made public and who was apparently not seriously hurt. Wyatt faces a count of aggravated assault for attacking the second woman. Related Content WATCH: Video shows police arresting suspect after double stabbing in downtown Pittsburgh A check of court records by Pittsburgh's Action News 4 shows that just months ago, Wyatt completed serving three years probation in a negotiated guilty plea to several non-violent offenses in his home community of McKeesport. The probation was for carrying a firearm without a license. The 2016 sentence included 100 hours of community service , part of which he was permitted to serve in North Carolina. As part of that agreement , he also pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and an accident causing injury and damage but he was sentenced to no further penalties. A receiving stolen property charge was withdrawn. Wyatt also faces a citation for disorderly conduct issued in McKeesport from in February 2019. Purdue-Dance was fatally stabbed in the neck Thursday morning at a downtown bus stop, right in front of a Pittsburgh police officer who had been checking on the woman's well-being at the time, police said. Watch the latest report from Pittsburgh's Action News 4 in the video player above. The suspect also stabbed a bystander near the bus stop before he was subdued and taken into custody at the scene on Sixth Avenue near Smithfield Street, police said. Police arrested Wyatt on charges of criminal homicide and aggravated assault. The Allegheny County medical examiner identified the woman who was stabbed to death as Purdue-Dance, 61, of Erie. Purdue-Dance died at UPMC Mercy. "We don't know the motivation at this time. We just don't know," said Cmdr. Vic Joseph, of the city's Major Crimes unit. He said the attack currently appears "by all accounts" to be a random act. Pittsburgh police later said in a press release that "there is no evidence to suggest that this attack was racially or religiously motivated." Joseph said an officer on patrol was talking to the woman, who appeared to be sleeping or possibly in medical distress at the bus stop, when a man came up and stabbed that woman and then assaulted a second woman who was walking down the street. The officer drew his gun, ordered the man to get on the ground and drop the weapon, then began applying pressure to the first woman's wound and tried to stop her bleeding, Joseph said. Hear from witnesses who saw the violence unfold in Pittsburgh's Action News 4 reporter Bob Mayo's report below: Video Player is loading. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration 0:00 Loaded: 0% Stream Type LIVE Seek to live, currently playing liveLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Captions captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text ColorWhite Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Background ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyTransparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Advertisement Police news conference on Downtown bus stop stabbing: Watch the video below. Video Player is loading. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration 0:00 Loaded: 0% Stream Type LIVE Seek to live, currently playing liveLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Captions captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text ColorWhite Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Background ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyTransparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Advertisement In response to another published report about the victims' clothing, officials said the woman who was fatally attacked at the bus stop was not wearing religious garb. Police said the woman who was stabbed while walking by the scene "may have been" wearing one. The woman who died has not been identified. The severity of the second victim's injuries was not clear; police said she was in stable condition at a hospital. The suspect was taken to police headquarters, where he was being interviewed by detectives Thursday afternoon. Witnesses gave Pittsburgh's Action News 4 their accounts of what they saw. "A man came out of nowhere, coming from that way, and stabbed her in the neck twice and then proceeded on to the Muslim woman and started punching her in the face," witness Kimberly Andrews, of Homewood, told Pittsburgh's Action News 4. "The officer then pulled out his gun and told him to get onto the ground. He wouldn't . I then yelled to him to just lay on the ground. Then when he was on the ground, I ran into this building right here and got paper towels for the woman." Another witness described what he perceived from a different perspective. "There was two ladies in the booth over there, and the guy got in an argument with one of them and the other one jumped in, and then he just pulled out a knife and started stabbing both of them," said George Williams, of McKees Rocks. From across the street, another witness saw the police officer react to the attacks. "I was standing here and I heard some screaming. And then the cop, I looked over and the cop was screaming at this guy. Then he backed up and the cop pulled his gun and then he got down onto the ground and then all these cop cars pulled up and they restrained him," said Nick Emery, of the North Side. Another man says he knows one of the victims and spoke with her. "She said 'I got stabbed!' I said, "Oh my God!' I knew her," said Chester Clark, of Oakland. Andrews, who returned to the scene later in the afternoon, was surprised and troubled that the bus stop was already back in service. "I went and got flowers to put at the site," Andrews said, adding she was upset to see commuters in the bus shelter. "That they're sitting there. That it's not closed out for like respecting (the victim who died)," she said. SEE VIDEO REPORTS ; https://www.wtae.com/article/stabbing-in-downtown-pittsburgh-sixth-avenue/28647022
  7. Is the 5-second rule true? What happens to food dropped on the floor Is the food still safe if you pick it up right away or will it make you sick? Sept. 21, 2016, 9:40 AM EDT / Source: TODAY By Barbara Mantel Everyone's done it: Dropped some food on the floor, quickly picked it up and eaten it -- or fed it to a child. The old 5-second rule claims bacteria will have no time to climb aboard if the food hasn't been in contact with the floor for more than five seconds. But is it right? Wrong, according to researchers at Rutgers University, who studied four different foods, dropped onto four different surfaces, for four different amounts of time. As part of the test, the researchers liberally applied Enterobacter aerogenes, a nonpathogenic “cousin” of salmonella, to each surface. “At the shortest amount of time we studied, which was a fraction of a second, no matter what food and what surface, we always found some bacteria transfer in at least one of our experimental trials,” says Donald Schaffner, a food science professor at Rutgers University and the lead author of the paper, published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. The researchers conducted multiple trials of each combination of food, surface and contact time. Seconds count While they showed the 5-second rule to be untrue, time does matter, said Schaffner. For many foods and many surfaces, the longer the food sat on the floor, the more bacteria it collected. That’s probably gravity at work, he said, pressing the food down and expanding the surface area in contact with the floor’s germs. You may think it's no big deal, but about 12 percent of food-borne illness reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the result of cross-contamination of food from surfaces. Related: Is the five-second rule real? Why research says the '10-second rule' is dangerous and could kill you March 29, 201601:57 To eat or not to eat In the study, not all foods were bacteria magnets and not all surfaces easily parted with bacteria. Carpet can be hard to clean compared to stainless steel, ceramic tile and wood. But, of the four, carpet transferred the least bacteria in the study. That’s because the bacteria sank down into the carpet’s fibers and away from its surface, said Schaffner. As far as the foods, watermelon had the most contamination, while gummy candy had the least. Bread and butter and plain bread were between the two extremes. “Watermelon was the most moist food we studied, and we saw almost all the bacteria transfer in the fraction of a second,” said Schaffner. The other contact times were five, 30 and 300 seconds. Bacteria need some way to get from point to point, and water is a great vehicle for that, he says. Related Food FoodAre you defrosting chicken correctly? 10 frozen food safety myths debunked The results for wood, stainless steel and tile varied depending on food and contact time. There have been other, sometimes contradictory, tests of the 5-second rule, but only one other peer-reviewed published paper in 2006. In that research, Clemson University researchers used bologna and bread and came to basically the same conclusion as the new report: If you eat food dropped on the floor, you’re taking a chance no matter how long it’s sat there, said food safety expert Paul Dawson, lead author of the Clemson study. “It really depends on what’s on that floor,” said Dawson. Before you eat the dropped food, stop. Think. Do you have pets who’ve stepped into who knows what or people tramping about your kitchen in dirty shoes? Another consideration: Who is eating the floor food? “Is the person very young, very old or immune compromised? All those things put that person at a higher risk of getting sick,” said Schaffner. SEE VIDEO REPORT ; https://www.today.com/health/5-second-rule-dropped-food-safe-t103093
  8. Reported structure fire on Jared St. in Brookville. Time 8:08 AM. St.2,6,10, DuBois 73 and ambulance to respond. Use caution in the area. ------ UPDATE - All units to cancel except St.2 - 8:10 AM.
  9. US Published 8 hours ago Suspect in disturbance at Missouri Walmart says he was testing 2nd Amendment rights: prosecutors By Bradford Betz | Fox News close Off-duty firefighter detains armed man at Missouri Walmart Police arrested suspect who wore body armor and had a loaded rifle; Matt Finn reports. A 20-year-old man who sent shoppers fleeing after he entered a Walmart store in Missouri while wearing body armor and carrying a rifle and handgun on Thursday, said he wanted to see whether the store would respect his Second Amendment rights, according to a probable cause statement released Friday. Dmitriy Andreychenko is facing a terrorist threat charge for the incident, which comes five days after a gunman walked into a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, and opened fire, killing 22 people. The next day, another shooter killed nine people in Dayton, Ohio, in an unrelated episode that has heightened discussions about gun control legislation and firearms safety. This undated booking shows 20-year-old Dmitriy Andreychenko, who police say entered a Walmart in Springfield, Missouri while carrying a rifle and wearing body armor. (Greene County Sheriff via AP) In the Missouri incident, Andreychenko started recording himself with his cellphone while still in the parking lot of the Springfield Walmart on Thursday afternoon. He got the body armor from the trunk of his car before grabbing a shopping cart and walked into the store, the probable cause statement said. A store manager activated a fire alarm, prompting shoppers to flee, police said. An off-duty firefighter apprehended Andreychenko and he was arrested. No shots were fired during the dramatic episode. Video The probable cause document quoted Andreychenko as saying he “wanted to know if Walmart honored the Second Amendment.” He said he had bought the rifle and body armor because of three recent shootings and a stabbing, and wanted to protect himself. “Missouri protects the right of people to open-carry a firearm, but that does not allow an individual to act in a reckless and criminal manner endangering other citizens," Greene County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Patterson said in a statement announcing charges. Patterson compared the actions of the accused to "falsely shouting fire in a theater, causing a panic." Andreychenko faces up to four years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000 if convicted of the felony charge of making a terrorist threat in the second degree, according to the prosecutor’s office. MISSOURI WALMART THREAT SUSPECT ID'D BY POLICE, MUG SHOT RELEASED Walmart issued a statement Friday that praised authorities for stopping the incident from escalating. It said Andreychenko is no longer welcome in its stores. "This was a reckless act designed to scare people, disrupt our business and it put our associates and customers at risk," said spokeswoman LeMia Jenkins. "We applaud the quick actions of our associates to evacuate customers from our store, and we're thankful no one was injured." Since January 2017, Missouri has not required a permit to openly or conceal carry a firearm for those 19 years or older. Roughly 30 states allow the open carrying of handguns and rifles and shotguns in public without a permit. https://www.foxnews.com/us/suspect-in-disturbance-at-missouri-walmart-said-he-was-testing-2nd-amendment-rights-prosecutors
  10. US Published 1 day ago Last Update 22 hours ago Armed off-duty firefighter halts armed suspect at Walmart store in Missouri, police say By Talia Kaplan | Fox News close Fox News Flash top headlines for August 9 Fox News Flash top headlines for August 9 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com An armed man reportedly wearing body armor and pushing a shopping cart at a Walmart store in Missouri on Thursday led a store manager to pull the fire alarm and sent customers fleeing -- but an armed off-duty firefighter was able to detain the man until police officers arrived, Springfield police said. The 20-year-old suspect was carrying loaded tactical weapons, according to reports. He was arrested at the scene and taken into custody, however, police didn't immediately say what charges he was arrested on. “His intent obviously was to cause chaos here, and he did that,” Springfield police Lt. Mike Lucas told The Springfield News-Leader. It wasn't immediately clear if the man who was detained told cops why he was at the store, however, the incident comes five days after a mass shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, that resulted in 22 deaths. In a Facebook post, Springfield police wrote that officers were dispatched to the Walmart store around 4:10 p.m. Thursday on reports of “an armed white male.” The suspect was wearing body armor and military-style clothing, according to the News-Leader, which cited information from Lucas. He walked inside the Walmart carrying a “tactical rifle” and another gun, the newspaper reported and had more than 100 rounds of ammunition. The suspect grabbed a cart, pushed it around the store and recorded cell phone video of himself walking through the Walmart, Springfield's KY3 reported, citing police. The television station reported that the store manager pulled a fire alarm, which prompted people to flee from the store. The suspect then made his way out an emergency exit where the firefighter held the man at gunpoint, the station reported, adding that police showed up about three minutes later and made the arrrest. Police said no shots were fired and no one was injured. Lucas described the suspect as “pretty stoic” during initial police contact, the News-Leader reported. “At this time, the investigation is on-going and we are working to determine his motives,” police said in the Facebook post. A fire marshal was reportedly called out to the scene to inspect the suspect’s car in the parking lot, to make sure there were no bombs in the vehicle. Police said investigators will review surveillance video from the store and also check the suspect’s social media accounts to see if he was live-streaming the events, the newspaper reported. SEE TWEETS ; https://www.foxnews.com/us/armed-man-arrested-at-missouri-walmart-police-say
  11. EPA won't approve warning labels for Roundup chemical by ADAM BEAM Associated Press Friday, August 9th 2019 AA 4 VIEW ALL PHOTOS FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2019, file photo, containers of Roundup are displayed on a store shelf in San Francisco. The Trump administration has instructed companies not to warn customers about products that contain glyphosate, a move aimed at California as it fights one of the world's largest agriculture companies about the potentially cancer-causing chemical.(AP Photo/Haven Daley, File) SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Trump administration has instructed companies not to warn customers about products that contain glyphosate, a move aimed at California as it fights one of the world's largest agriculture companies about the potentially cancer-causing chemical. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will no longer approve labels warning glyphosate is known to cause cancer. The chemical is marketed as a weed killer by Monsanto under the brand Roundup. (Cropped Photo: Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0 via MGN Online) California requires warning labels on glyphosate products because the International Agency for Research on Cancer has said it is "probably carcinogenic." The EPA disagrees, saying its research shows the chemical poses no risks to public health. "It is irresponsible to require labels on products that are inaccurate when EPA knows the product does not pose a cancer risk," EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said in a statement. "We will not allow California's flawed program to dictate federal policy." California's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, approved by voters in 1986, requires the government to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer, as determined by a variety of outside groups that include the EPA and IARC. The law also requires companies to warn customers about those chemicals. California regulators have twice concluded glyphosate did not pose a cancer risk for drinking water. But in 2015, the IARC classified the chemical as "probably carcinogenic," triggering a warning label under California law. Monsanto sued, and last year a federal judge blocked California from enforcing the warning label until the lawsuit is resolved. (Photo: Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0 via MGN Online) Federal law regulates how pesticides are used and how they are labeled. States are often allowed to impose their own requirements, but they can't be weaker than the federal law, according to Brett Hartl, government affairs director for the Center for Biological Diversity. Hartl said it is unusual for the EPA to tell a state it can't go beyond the federal requirements. "It's a little bit sad the EPA is the biggest cheerleader and defender of glyphosate," Hartl said. "It's the Environmental Protection Agency, not the pesticide protection agency." In a letter to companies explaining its decision, Michael L. Goodis, director of EPA's registration division in its Office of Pesticide Programs, said the agency considers labels warning glyphosate to cause cancer to "constitute a false and misleading statement," which is prohibited by federal law. (Photo: Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0 DE via MGN Online) Chandra Lord, a representative for Monsanto's parent company Bayer AG, said the EPA's announcement "is fully consistent with the science-based conclusions reached by the agency and leading health regulators worldwide for more than four decades." "Glyphosate is not carcinogenic," Lord said. An estimated 13,000 plaintiffs have pending lawsuits against Monsanto concerning glyphosate. Three of those cases went to trial in California, and juries awarded damages in each case, although judges later reduced the amounts. In May, a jury ordered Monsanto to pay a California couple $2.055 billion dollars after a trial where they blamed the company's product for caused their cancers. Last month , a judge reduced that award to $87 million. https://wjactv.com/news/nation-world/epa-wont-approve-warning-labels-for-roundup-chemical
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