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soccermom

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soccermom last won the day on November 2

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  1. New Air Fryer

    I was thinking the same thing.
  2. Okay, this is amazing. They also recently found these in Saudi Arabia in the same region: A Close-Up on Mysteries Made of Stone in Saudi Arabia’s Desert Structures that may have been created by ancient tribes could only be studied using Google Earth. Saudi officials finally invited an archaeologist to observe them via helicopter. By Nicholas St. Fleur Nov. 17, 2017 A group of 19 "keyholes" at Al Wadi, in the Saudi Arabian desert, observed by archaeologist David Kennedy from a helicopter. Dr. Kennedy took more than 6,000 aerial photographs of these mysterious, ancient structures.CreditDavid Kennedy For nearly a decade, David Kennedy marveled from behind his computer screen at thousands of mysterious stone structures scattered across Saudi Arabia’s desert. With Google Earth’s satellite imagery at his fingertips, the archaeologist peeked at burial sites and other so-called Works of the Old Men, created by nomadic tribes thousands of years ago. But he was unable to secure permission to visit the country to observe up close the ancient designs that he and amateur archaeologists had studied from their desktops. Last month, after announcing he had identified nearly 400 stone “gates,” Dr. Kennedy received the invitation of a lifetime from Saudi officials to investigate the hidden structures from a helicopter. “They are absolutely astonishing,” said Dr. Kennedy, who recently retired from the University of Western Australia. “From 500 feet, you can see the vital details of structures that are invisible in the fuzzy image on Google Earth.” Over the course of three days, he snapped more than 6,000 aerial photographs, lifting the veil on the ancient wonders. A group of 19 "keyholes" at Al Wadi, in the Saudi Arabian desert, observed by archaeologist David Kennedy from a helicopter. Dr. Kennedy took more than 6,000 aerial photographs of these mysterious, ancient structures.CreditDavid Kennedy For nearly a decade, David Kennedy marveled from behind his computer screen at thousands of mysterious stone structures scattered across Saudi Arabia’s desert. With Google Earth’s satellite imagery at his fingertips, the archaeologist peeked at burial sites and other so-called Works of the Old Men, created by nomadic tribes thousands of years ago. But he was unable to secure permission to visit the country to observe up close the ancient designs that he and amateur archaeologists had studied from their desktops. Last month, after announcing he had identified nearly 400 stone “gates,” Dr. Kennedy received the invitation of a lifetime from Saudi officials to investigate the hidden structures from a helicopter. “They are absolutely astonishing,” said Dr. Kennedy, who recently retired from the University of Western Australia. “From 500 feet, you can see the vital details of structures that are invisible in the fuzzy image on Google Earth.” Since 1997, Dr. Kennedy has studied similar structures in neighboring Jordan from the ground and sky. Many of the stone figures in both countries are in basalt fields known as harrats. The fields often feature dried up lava streams that twist and turn like slithering snakes across the dark landscape. In Saudi Arabia, he explored 200 sites from the air across the regions of Harrat Khaybar and Harrat Uwayrid. The structures he observed ranged in shapes and sizes, which he describes as gates, kites, triangles, bull’s eyes and keyholes. Of the 400 structures he describes as “gates” that he had identified on Google Earth, Dr. Kennedy studied about 40 from the helicopter and found that the structures were not randomly put together. “We could see immediately they were much more complicated than they appeared on Google Earth,” Dr. Kennedy said. They were not simply heaps of stone. Rather, each long bar was actually made up of two parallel lines of flat slabs placed on their edges facing each other with small stones filling the space in between. “They are much more sophisticated than I was prepared for,” he said. Some gates were larger than 1,000 feet long and 250 feet wide. He suspected the oldest may be about 9,000 years old. Though he is not sure of their purpose, he speculated they may have been used for farming purposes. Dr. Kennedy also got a closer look at about a dozen of the “kites” that were first discovered in the Middle East by pilots in the 1920s. These are the most famous of the Works of the Old Men, and Dr. Kennedy has identified more than 900 of them in Saudi Arabia’s Harrat Khaybar. From above, they typically resemble kites with strings and tails. They are often very large, with many stretching more than a quarter-mile. Archaeologists think gazelle were corralled into the head of the kite, where the hunters would come out to kill them. Sometimes multiple kites would overlap, so that if the animals got past one funnel they would get caught in another. “Essentially there was no escape,” said Dr. Kennedy. The ones in Saudi Arabia looked as if they were better built than the ones in Jordan, according to Dr. Kennedy. The harrats were littered with the smaller structures he has named keyholes, wheels, triangles and bull’s-eyes. Dr. Kennedy said he was surprised at how straight the lines of the triangles and keyholes were, as if the people who made them had picked out specific flat stones rather than random rocks. Each triangle was isosceles and looked like it was pointing at something. Sometimes they were directed to a bull’s-eye that was about 15 feet or 150 feet away. There were also several keyhole structures, sometimes lined up together. The heads of the keyholes were almost always near-perfect circles, and the walls were about three feet high. These structures may have served some funerary or symbolic purpose. Dr. Kennedy did not date any of the structures he visited with radiocarbon testing, but he said that future groups should perform more thorough analysis. “It’s absolutely vital that somebody follows up with serious groundwork,” he said. Dr. Kennedy was invited by Amr AlMadani, the chief executive officer of the Royal Commission for Al-Ula Province, which was created to safeguard some of the country’s geological, historical and archaeological sites. “Dr. Kennedy has spent many years poring over Google Earth images, and we were able to get him much closer to the sites,” said Mr. AlMadani, who joined Dr. Kennedy in the helicopter and described the experience as exciting. “Thinking about how life was in the Arabian Peninsula and trying to imagine the way people hunted, lived and buried the dead was very much enriching,” he wrote in an email. Seeing it on Google images is one thing, but seeing it from a helicopter window from 300 feet is a totally different thing,” said Don Boyer, who accompanied Dr. Kennedy. At the age of 70, Mr. Boyer is completing his doctorate in geoarchaeology and hydrology. “I think I was on a high the whole time. It was just remarkable. You run out of adjectives.” Archaeologists not involved in the work called it a step forward in showing the rich and complicated prehistory of the Arabian Peninsula. Huw Groucutt, an archaeologist at the University of Oxford, said the new images were very important, and that they can help show how human societies have modified the landscape. “The challenge now is to conduct work on the ground,” he added. Michael Petraglia, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, agreed. “What is so critical is to do ground survey and detailed excavation work. Otherwise, archaeological sites will often time seem mysterious and enigmatic,” he said in an email. ADVERTISEMENT “Now the big and more difficult task is to document such structures on the ground to examine their function and to understand human life” in the region over time, he added. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/17/science/saudi-arabia-gates.html
  3. New Air Fryer

    Walmart has a Farberware Air Fryer for only $39.00 on Black Friday, and Best Buy has a Chefman Express for only $39.99.
  4. old member just re-joined

    I remember you UsedToBeABeaver, otherwise know as Bennyboy!
  5. Charges Dropped Against Sugar Shack Slasher

    No, I haven't heard a thing.
  6. This happened on October 17th and it's just now reported?
  7. That's a really nice thing to do Petee!
  8. It would be nice if someone who knows her would show her this story.
  9. These may be the world’s first images of dogs—and they’re wearing leashes By David GrimmNov. 16, 2017 , 8:00 AM Carved into a sandstone cliff on the edge of a bygone river in the Arabian Desert, a hunter draws his bow for the kill. He is accompanied by 13 dogs, each with its own coat markings; two animals have lines running from their necks to the man’s waist. The engravings likely date back more than 8000 years, making them the earliest depictions of dogs, a new study reveals. And those lines are probably leashes, suggesting that humans mastered the art of training and controlling dogs thousands of years earlier than previously thought. “It’s truly astounding stuff,” says Melinda Zeder, an archaeozoologist at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. “It’s the only real demonstration we have of humans using early dogs to hunt.” But she cautions that more work will be needed to confirm both the age and meaning of the depictions. The hunting scene comes from Shuwaymis, a hilly region of northwestern Saudi Arabia where seasonal rains once formed rivers and supported pockets of dense vegetation. For the past 3 years, Maria Guagnin, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany—in partnership with the Saudi Commission for Tourism & National Heritage—has helped catalog more than 1400 rock art panels containing nearly 7000 animals and humans at Shuwaymis and Jubbah, a more open vista about 200 kilometers north that was once dotted with lakes. Starting about 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers entered—or perhaps returned to—the region. What appear to be the oldest images are thought to date to this time and depict curvy women. Then about 7000 to 8000 years ago, people here became herders, based on livestock bones found at Jubbah; that’s likely when pictures of cattle, sheep, and goats began to dominate the images. In between—carved on top of the women and under the livestock—are the early hunting dogs: 156 at Shuwaymis and 193 at Jubbah. All are medium-sized, with pricked up ears, short snouts, and curled tails—hallmarks of domestic canines. In some scenes, the dogs face off against wild donkeys. In others, they bite the necks and bellies of ibexes and gazelles. And in many, they are tethered to a human armed with a bow and arrow. The researchers couldn’t directly date the images, but based on the sequence of carving, the weathering of the rock, and the timing of the switch to pastoralism, “The dog art is at least 8000 to 9000 years old,” Guagnin says. That may edge out depictions of dogs previously labeled the oldest, paintings on Iranian pottery dated to at most 8000 years ago. “When Maria came to me with the rock art photos and asked me if they meant anything, I about lost my mind,” says co-author Angela Perri, a zooarchaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Perri has studied the bones of ancient dogs around the world, and has argued that early dogs were critical in human hunting. “A million bones won’t tell me what these images are telling me,” she says. “It’s the closest thing you’re going to get to a YouTube video.” The ancient hunting dogs of Saudi Arabia (bottom) may have resembled the Canaan breed of dog (top). (Top to bottom): Alexandra Baranova/Wikimedia Commons; M.Guagnin et al., Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 2017 The dogs look a lot like today’s Canaan dog, says Perri, a largely feral breed that roams the deserts of the Middle East. That could indicate that these ancient people bred dogs that had already adapted to hunting in the desert, the team reports this week in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. Or people may even have independently domesticated these dogs from the Arabian wolf long after dogs were domesticated elsewhere, which likely happened sometime between 15,000 and 30,000 years ago. But Zeder notes that the engravings may not be as old as they seem. To confirm the chronology, scientists will need to link the images to a well-dated archaeological site—a challenge, she says, because “the archaeological record in this region is really spotty.” Paul Tacon, an archaeologist at Griffith University in Gold Coast, Australia, agrees that “dating rock art is often a guestimate.” But based on his nearly 4 decades of studying such images around the world, he says, “Their chronology is sound.” Even if the art is younger than Guagnin and her colleagues think, the leashes are by far the oldest on record. Until now, the earliest evidence for such restraints came from a wall painting in Egypt dated to about 5500 years ago, Perri says. The Arabian hunters may have used the leashes to keep valuable scent dogs close and protected, she says, or to train new dogs. Leashing dogs to the hunter’s waist may have freed his hands for bow and arrow. But Tacon cautions that the lines in the engravings could be symbolic. “It could just be a depiction of a bond.” Either way, he says, that bond was clearly strong, as the artists appear to have depicted dogs they actually knew, with particular coat patterns, stances, and genders. “These creatures were very important, beloved companions.” Such a relationship would have been critical to helping people survive a harsh environment. Dogs could take down gazelles and ibexes too fast for humans, Perri says. Details of the images also suggest that the ancient hunters tailored their strategies to the landscape, Zeder says. At Shuwaymis, where the dogs may have been used to drive prey into the corners of uneven terrain, the art depicts large packs. At Jubbah, the images show smaller groups of dogs that may have ambushed prey at watering holes. “People were able to venture into these inhospitable areas by strategically marshalling dogs to survive,” Zeder says. “And now we’re seeing a real picture of how it happened.” http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/11/these-may-be-world-s-first-images-dogs-and-they-re-wearing-leashes
  10. Cough Relief

    That little thing works wonders! I used to do it every other day, but got lazy and haven't done it in a while.
  11. Charges Dropped Against Sugar Shack Slasher

    Well I didn't read her the info on her mug shot, so it must be a different person. As to a 215lb stripper, I'll bet they exist.
  12. Cough Relief

    I had it too and have been coughing my lungs out. I used the neti pot and so far, the coughing has stopped.
  13. Charges Dropped Against Sugar Shack Slasher

    I saw that and wondered if it was a misprint. If she was 16 when she went missing, she would be 22 now. That can't be a common name. I emailed the owner of that website and included the link to the story. I will let you know if I hear anything.
  14. Charges Dropped Against Sugar Shack Slasher

    OMG! http://www.laws9.com/missingkids/detail/id/3367
  15. A lot bigger with huge antlers. Did you see the picture of the elk she shot? I grew up in the country and we were not allowed outside during deer hunting season.
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